Poverty in America: The Welfare Dilemma

By Ralph Segalman; Asoke Basu | Go to book overview

MEDICAL SERVICES FOR THE POOR

Socioeconomic Status or Discrimination

TWO prevailing assumptions underlie most contemporary discussions of medical services for the poor in America. One is that the poor population receives less medical care because they are poor--a systemic discrimination. The other is that because the poor lack medical knowledge and have less education than other social classes, they have impaired health--a class condition. The current debate over national health insurance bills introduced in the Ninety-fifth Congress, which propose to remedy the needs of the poor for improved care and to aid those who have no medical assistance, focuses on these two assumptions.

Lefkowitz ( 1970 and 1973) has undertaken a careful analysis of data relating to questions of poverty and health. He has found that the correlation between poverty and poor health usually disappears when education is taken into account. The correlation can also be considered less than significant because both income and medical deprivation appear to be consequences, at least in part, of education. The claimed assumptions of poverty and ill health have corollaries. One is that the poor receive less medical care and lower quality care than others. Lefkowitz's examination of the data indicates that there is little correlation between the average number of physician visits per person per year and family income. In terms of quality of care, Lefkowitz has found that education rather than income is related to medical care utilization. Leveson has also found that when other factors are held constant education is the key factor in medical care utilization. Lefkowitz's study, however, omits the distinction between perceived poor health and poor health as verified by objective clinical findings.

In terms of clinic care versus private physician care, Lefkowitz ( 1970 and 1973) also found that the proportion of one to the other is the same among the poor and other populations. He says that the image that the poor are at the mercy of public clinics is overdrawn.

There are other questions about the health of the poor. If the poor are less healthy than others but utilize medical care facilities in much the

-232-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poverty in America: The Welfare Dilemma
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Sociology Series Editor: Don Martindale ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgements iv
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • PROGRAMS AND BILLS xv
  • 1 - The Parameters of Poverty 3
  • References 48
  • 2 - Poor Law and the Poor 57
  • References 88
  • 3 - Programs of Public Assistance and Social Insurance in America 91
  • References 129
  • 4 - Social Interventions Against Poverty 131
  • References 181
  • 5 - Income Maintenance Proposals and the Question of Poverty 188
  • References 227
  • 6 - Medical Services for the Poor 232
  • References 266
  • 7 - Housing Assistance 271
  • References 305
  • 8 - Work, Education, and Poverty in America 309
  • References 363
  • POSTSCRIPT 369
  • References 375
  • Bibliography 377
  • Index 399
  • Vita 419
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 426

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.