Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism: The Genesis of Modern German Political Thought, 1790-1800

By Frederick C. Beiser | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abel, Karl, 85
Alienation: anticipated by Kant, 31-32; but not eliminated by him, 54-55; Fichte's radical critique of, 57, 73; Forster's views on, 180-181, 183; romantic analysis of, 230-231; conservative view of, 285
Allgemeine Landsrecht, 126-128
American Revolution: importance for liberalism, 23; reaction of Forster to, 163; Wieland's views on, 349
Anarchism: romantic ideal of, 19-20; conservative rejection of, 19, 284-285; Fichte's ideal of, 58-59, 91; Humboldt's rejection of, 133; Forster's flirtation with, 180-181; Herder's tendency toward, 112-213
Aristocracy: Kant's attitude toward, 35; Schiller's views on, go, 96; Humboldt's defense of, 111-112, 114, 116; Herder's critique of, 217; Novalis' position on, 266; conservative defense of, 285-286, 292-295, 296, 336
Aufklärer: influence on Humboldt, 112, 121, 123; role in formulation of Allgemeine Landsrecht, 127-128; Jacobi's attack on, 147-148; alliance with Friedrich II, 147, 282, 309, 312; Forster's critique of, 179-180; their ethic of perfection, 214; Schlegel's reckoning with, 254; as defenders of absolutism, 282, 309-310; adherence to natural law, 310; their limits to enlightenment, 310; their place in conservative thought, 310; their demise at the close of the eighteenth century, 310-311
Auflädrung: its crisis in the 1790s, 2-3, 4-5, 97-98, 147-148, 203-204, 229-230, 309-311, 363-365; faith in reason, 4-7; relation to liberalism, 23- 24; alliance with absolutism, 24, 146- 148, 310-311, 312-313, 347-349, 350-353; alleged connection with French Revolution, 48-50, 149, 297, 318, 330, 364; Berliners' conception of, 147-148, 196-197, 203-204, 310-311. See also Conservatism; Romanticism
Baader, Franz, 224
Biester, J. E., 50, 147, 179-180
Bildung: significance for liberals, 14-25; as precondition of political change, 24-25, 97-98, 176, 229, 247, 266, 358; Kant's skepticism of, 54; Schiller's concept of, 101-101, 107; Humboldt's concept of, 132-133, 136; Forster's concept of, 182- 184; Herder's views on, 196-197, 203, 212; romantic view of, 229, 240, 246, 255; Wieland's views on, 358
Böhmer, Caroline, 245, 249, 252
Burke, Edmund: Kant's debate with, 39; views of Humboldt on, it 8; Forster's opinion of, 171, 173; romantic rejection of, 231, 238-239; influence on Novalis, 265; influence on conservatism, 287-288; influence on Gentz, 320
Censorship: Wöllner's policies of, 48-49, 50, 78, 128-130, 310-311; Kant's fears of, 50-5 1; Fichte's experience of, 78; Humboldt's encounter with, 124, 130; Forster's attack upon, 179-180; Herder's ordeal with, 216-217; Novalis' rejection of, 267; conservative defense of, 284, 331; Berliner's demise under, 310-311; Wieland's response to, 353-354
Civil society: conservative attitude toward, 19; critique of its materialism and egoism, 19, 151, 232-236; Schiller's critique of, 103-104; Humboldt's attitude

-429-

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