Across the Boundaries of Belief: Contemporary Issues in the Anthropology of Religion

By Morton Klass; Maxine Weisgrau | Go to book overview
5.
The sodalities which Yukioma lists conform to what I have elsewhere ( 1985) termed First and Second Order societies.
6.
It is possible that differing interpretations of the sources of and solutions for societal stress in late nineteenth-century Oraibi produced a conflict of roles between the Kikmongwi and the Qaletaqmongwi, which may have been part of the friction that led to the split.
7.
The political effects of secret knowledge have received increasing attention in recent ethnography (e.g. Barth 1975; Lewis 1980; Murphy 1980; Rubinstein 1981; Bellman 1984; Lindstrom 1984; Traube 1984; Fardon 1985b). Secrecy, of course, serves other social and personal functions too. Luhrmann ( 1986) recent analysis of middle-class British magical cults does much to clarify the social and psychological effects of secrecy in ritual practices. A full consideration of the effects of institutionalised secrecy in Hopi society should include an examination of the sort of psychological ramifications Luhrmann discusses. This, however, goes beyond my present scope.
8.
Some Third Mesa people say a tunnel ran from Yukioma's house to Loololma's (the factional leaders in 1900); there they would meet to jointly plan events connected with the Otaibi split. This may be an idealisation, although tunnels are well-known in Puebloan archeological sites.

References

Adams E. B. 1963. Fray Silvestre and the obstinate Hopi. New Mex. hist. Rev. 28, 97-138.

Adams R. N. 1977. Power in human societies: a synthesis. In The anthropology of power (eds) R. D. Fogelson & R. N. Adams. New York: Academic Press.

Bhern E. M. 1981. Chinese ritual and politics. Cambridge: Univ. Press.

Barth F. 1975. Ritual and knowledge among the Baktaman of New Guinea. New Haven: Yale Univ. Press.

----- Process and form in social life. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Bellman B. L. 1984. The language of secrecy: symbols and metaphors in Poro ritual. New Brunswick: Rutgers Univ. Press.

Bloch M. 1974. Symbols, song, dance and features of articulation: is religion an extreme form of traditional authority? Eur. J. Sociol. 15, 55-81.

----- 1980. Ritual symbolism and the non-representation of society. In Symbol as sense: new approaches to the analysis of meaning (eds) M. L. Foster & S. H. Brandes. New York: Academic Press.

Brandt E. 1980. On secrecy and the control of knowledge: Taos Pueblo. In Secrecy: a cross- cultural perspective (ed.) S. K. Tefft. New York: Human Sciences Press.

----- 1985. Internal stratification in Pueblo communities. Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Anthropological Association ( 1985).

Brandt R. 1954. Hopi ethics: a theoretical analysis. Chicago: Univ. Press.

Bunzel R. 1938. The economic organization of primitive peoples. In General anthropology (ed.) F. Boas. New York: Heath.

Clastres P. 1977. Society against the state. New York: Urizen Books.

Clemmer R. O. 1978. Continuities of Hopi culture change. Ramona, Cal: Acoma Books.

----- 1982. The Hopi Traditionalist movement. Paper presented at the School of American Research Advanced Seminar on "The Hopi Indians" ( 1982).

Cohen A. 1970. The political system. In A handbook of method in cultural anthropology (eds) R. Narroll & R. Cohen. Garden City: Natural History Press.

-321-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Across the Boundaries of Belief: Contemporary Issues in the Anthropology of Religion
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 418

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.