France in the Modern World

By Niles M. Hansen | Go to book overview

3
French Society

THE DEMOGRAPHIC REVOLUTION

FROM the end of the eighteenth century to the present time the population of France increased from about 27 million to about 49 million. On the other hand, the population of Europe during this interval tripled, increasing from about 180 to over 550 million. Thus, whereas the French population represented around 15 percent of the European total in 1800, it fell to 7.8 percent in 1960.

During the last half of the eighteenth century the population of France increased by 29 percent and that of Europe by 38 percent. This difference grew larger in the next half-century when France's population grew by 33 percent, while that of Europe increased by 50 percent. During the last half of the nineteenth century the relative decline in French population became alarming. As in the first fifty years of the century Europe's population grew by about 50 percent, but the growth of French population amounted to only 11.5 percent, taking account of the loss of Alsace-Lorraine. Moreover, France would have confronted a definite likelihood of population decline had it not been for immigration. On the eve of the First World War, France which, with the exception of Russia, had once been the most populous country in Europe, had a smaller population than either Germany, Austria-Hungary or Great Britain. Germany and France had faced one another in 1870 with approximately equal populations, but by 1914 the German Empire had nearly 65 million inhabitants compared to the French total of only 40 million.

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
France in the Modern World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Contents 5
  • 1 - The Geographic Background 7
  • 2 - Dominant Themes 22
  • 3 - French Society 41
  • 4 - Government and Politics 60
  • 5 - General De Gaulle and the Fifth Republic 84
  • 6 - The French Economy and Indicative Planning 101
  • 7 - France's European and World Roles 131
  • 8 - A Summary View 155
  • Study Guide 160
  • Suggested Readings 163
  • Index 165
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.