France in the Modern World

By Niles M. Hansen | Go to book overview

7 France's European and World Roles

FRENCH CULTURE IN THE WORLD

DURING the thirteenth century and again during the eighteenth French civilization was the dominant influence in Western civilization. Under the influence of Diderot, Voltaire, and Montesquieu, Catherine the Great completed Peter the Great's work of opening Russia to the West, while the French libraries of the educated middle-classes were instrumental in shaping a new world across the Atlantic. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries French was the language of the European aristocracy and of world diplomacy, though in this century it has been increasingly displaced by English, which also is the language of the expanding new world of international business. Nevertheless, French is one of the two official languages of NATO and of the UN, and it retains an eminent place in the diplomatic and intellectual worlds. It is the mother tongue of over 70 million of the world's inhabitants and an auxiliary language in numerous African countries. Some 2,000 French language newspapers and magazines are published outside of France, notably in Belgium, Switzerland, and Canada. French influence abroad is also assured by the 800,000 French citizens living outside of France, including the 100,000 living in the United States.

Although the colonial empire of France was built up for the most part in the last century, French interest in overseas expansion was evident in the sixteenth century, when French sailors explored the

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
France in the Modern World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Contents 5
  • 1 - The Geographic Background 7
  • 2 - Dominant Themes 22
  • 3 - French Society 41
  • 4 - Government and Politics 60
  • 5 - General De Gaulle and the Fifth Republic 84
  • 6 - The French Economy and Indicative Planning 101
  • 7 - France's European and World Roles 131
  • 8 - A Summary View 155
  • Study Guide 160
  • Suggested Readings 163
  • Index 165
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.