Varieties of Memory and Consciousness: Essays in Honour of Endel Tulving

By Henry L. Roediger III; Fergus I. M. Craik et al. | Go to book overview

6
Remembering Dissociations

L. Weiskrantz University of Oxford

One of the truly gratifying developments over the past decade, and one to which Endel Tulving and his clinical colleagues have made particular contributions, has been the marriage between theory construction in human experimental psychology and research findings in neuropsychology. For the latter to be of any use for the former, conclusions and inferences must be capable of being cast in terms of independent or interacting parallel pathways, or in ordered sequences of hierarchies of processes along given pathways, including feedback loops upon that pathway. Needless to say, this is so only if the theoretical flow diagrams are themselves cast in such terms. But, in neuropsychology, the raw data are always cast in the form: Lesion X produces Deficit on Task A. If one substitutes "Treatment" (e.g., a drug, sensory deprivation, stress, etc.) for "Lesions" and substitutes "Behavioral Outcome" for "Deficit", then precisely the same logic applies, and so the issues have much wider application (cf. Weiskrantz, 1968a). What I explore here is how we go from those simple conjunctions in the raw data to inferences that are in a useful form. Having considered some of these general principles in the first part of the chapter, I then follow up with some evidence about dissociations that lead one to inferences about multiple memory systems.

In neuropsychology, as it is practiced today, there are two approaches, sometimes it seems, two cultures, that derive naturally from neuropsychologists collectively, but not necessarily individually, having quite practical responsibilities as well as a deep curiosity about the mind-brain question. There are those who have an abiding and important practical concern, often driven by the everyday needs of the clinical scene, who wish to describe and treat patients with similar clusters of deficits, typically drawn from common aetiological sources. There are those, on the other hand, who focus on particular pieces of neuropsychological

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Varieties of Memory and Consciousness: Essays in Honour of Endel Tulving
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.