Varieties of Memory and Consciousness: Essays in Honour of Endel Tulving

By Henry L. Roediger III; Fergus I. M. Craik et al. | Go to book overview

and long-term will very plausibly comment on two of our concerns in this chapter. First, the uninterrupted pace of contextual change could provide the constancy that gives "primary memory" its Jamesian recollective experience of belonging to the conscious present. Second, the source of classical amnesia may be understood by virtue of a special vulnerability, or fragility in the sense of neo- consolidation theory, of the contextual connections with other aspects of the processing system. The argument that amnesia could not be a disturbance of consciousness is a well-understood proviso in the theory of amnesia--anmesics show no obvious signs of not being aware of the world around them as they go about their lives. It is the survival of traces connecting this awareness with the processing systems used in the past that may be disturbed.

This does not sound to me like a distinction between procedural and declarative memory as two systems, as such. It sounds like one element of normal memory--the knowledge that that processing occurred in that context--is compromised. On the other hand, if we have a model of memory that is vertically modular, each of quite a few coding formats distinct from the others, then loss of context connections would be just the loss of information of one among many specialized codes.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I greatly appreciate the comments of my colleagues Donald Broadbent, Fergus Craik, and Michael Watkins on an earlier version of this chapter, whose preparation was also supported by Grant BNS 86 08344 from the National Science Foundation.


REFERENCES

Anderson J. R., & Bower G. H. ( 1972). "Recognition and retrieval processes in free recall". Psychological Review, 79, 97-123.

Baddeley A. D. ( 1983). "Working memory". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, B, 382, 311-324.

Baddeley A. D. ( 1986). Working memory. New York: Oxford University Press.

Baddeley A. D., & Hitch G. J. ( 1974). Working memory. In G. H. Bower (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation, (Vol. 8), (pp. 47-89). New York: Academic Press.

Baddeley A. D., & Hitch G. J. ( 1977). Recency revisited. In S. Domic (Ed.), Attention and Performance 6 (pp. 647-667). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Baddeley A. D., & Scott D. ( 1971). "Short-term forgetting in the absence of proactive inhibition". Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 23, 275-283.

Baddeley A. D., Thomson N., & Buchanan M. ( 1975). "Word length and the structure of short- term memory". Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 14, 575-589.

Bennett R. W. ( 1975). "Proactive interference in short-term memory: Fundamental forgetting processes". Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 14, 123-144.

-290-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Varieties of Memory and Consciousness: Essays in Honour of Endel Tulving
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.