CHAPTER XXIX
CLAUDE MONET 1840- Impressionist School of France
HASHIMOTO GAHO 1834- Modern School of Japan

WE touched upon Oriental art at the very beginning of our story. Then it was the Byzantine offshoot of it that we were considering, and the efforts of Giotto to liberate painting from the shackles of its traditions. Now, however, it is the art of Japan that claims our attention, and it does so because, as we saw in the previous chapter, it has been a source of some fresh inspiration to Western painting. The latest phase of the latter is represented in Monet, while Gaho is the foremost living artist in Japan. They are both landscape-painters.

We have seen that Manet was the founder of the modern impressionism, yet in the minds of the public Monet stands forth as the most conspicuous impressionist; and, as his later pictures are painted not in masses of color but with an infinity of little dabs of paint, the public is apt to suppose that this method of painting is what is meant by impressionism. Now Monet, like Manet, is an impressionist, in that what he strives to render is the effect vividly produced upon the eye by a scene; and, working always out of doors, he goes further than this,

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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Author's Note xiii
  • I - Introduction 3
  • II - Cimabue -- Giotto 8
  • III - Masaccio -- Mantegna 20
  • IV - Fra Angelico -- Jan Van Eyck 37
  • V - Botticelli -- Memling 52
  • VI - Perogino -- Bellini 68
  • VII - Raphael -- Wolgemuth 85
  • VIII - Da Vinci -- Dürer 109
  • IX - Titian -- Holbein the Younger 125
  • X - Correggio -- Michelangelo 142
  • XI - Veronese -- Tintoretto 159
  • XII - Rubens -- Velasquez 177
  • XIII - Van Dyck -- Frans Hals 195
  • XIV - Rembrandt -- Murillo 209
  • XV - Jacob van Ruisdael -- Poussin 228
  • XVI - Hobbema -- Claude Lorrain 242
  • XVII - Watteau -- Hogarth 255
  • XVIII - Reynolds -- Gainsborough 272
  • XIX - Constable -- Turner 287
  • XX - David -- Delacroix 304
  • XXI - Rousseau -- Corot 322
  • XXII - Breton -- Millet 339
  • XXIII - Courbet -- Boecklin 353
  • XXIV - Rossetti -- Holman Hunt 371
  • XXV - Piloty -- Fortuny 391
  • XXVI - Manet -- Israels 404
  • XXVII - Puvis de Chavannes -- Gérôme 423
  • XXVIII - Whistler -- Sargent 441
  • XXIX - Monet -- Hashimoto Gaho 457
  • Concluding Note 479
  • Parrallel Chronology of Painters Included *
  • A Brief Bibliography of Books On Art Readily Procurable 481
  • Glossary of Terms 484
  • Index 493
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