Technology and the Transformation of White-Collar Work

By Robert E. Kraut | Go to book overview

13
Choices En Route to the Office of Tomorrow
Niels Bjørn-Andersen Institute of Informatics and Management Accounting Copenhagen School of Business Administration Dian Kjærgaard Department of Business Administration Odense University, Denmark
ABSTRACT

This chapter presents and illustrates seven fundamental choices that are always made, explicitly or implicitly, when planning, designing, buying, and implementing office technology. The authors challenge users, management, and design teams--especially systems analysts and programmers--to heed the lessons of impact research: The costs and benefits of information technology are determined by technical, social, and political choices, many of which can be made in individual organizations. What is more, technology that supports and develops all white-collar employees--regardless of their status--usually benefits the organization as a whole. Conversely, oppressive technology often is bad for the organization--and for society, as well.

Most of the chapters in this book have reported studies on the impact of information technology (e.g., data processing systems, decision support systems, office automation systems, etc.). The results have shown that there is very little determinism at play. Most changes are contingent upon other factors--both planned and accidental (cf. Bjørn-Andersen, Eason, & Robey, 1986; Kling, 1980b). The ways in which new technology transform white- collar work depend greatly on which technology is chosen, who chooses it, how it is designed and installed, how it is used and what it is used for.The purpose of this chapter is to summarize what we believe to be the most important lessons of "impact research" in a way that we hope will provoke our readers into carefully considering seven fundamental choices:
How broadly one defines the scope of the design and implementation process,

-237-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Technology and the Transformation of White-Collar Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.