Theatre U.S.A., 1665 to 1957

By Barnard Hewitt | Go to book overview

For Further Reading

General

The most recent and most inclusive attempt to survey both theatre and drama is Glenn Hughes, A History of the American Theatre, 1700- 1950, Samuel French, Inc., New York, 1951; primarily annals, it is useful chiefly as a reference. Lloyd Morris, Curtain Time, Random House, Inc., New York, 1953, covers the ground from 1810 in a more selective narrative. A great deal of information and many illustrations, in encyclopedia form, are contained in The American Stage by Oral Sumner Coad and Edwin Mims Jr., Yale University Press, New Haven, 1929; it is volume 14 of The Pageant of America. Also useful is Arthur Hornblow, A History of the Theatre in America, 2 vols., J. B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia, 1919.

Special aspects of theatre are surveyed in Cecil Smith, Musical Comedy in America, Theatre Arts Books, New York, 1950; Alfred L. Bernheim, The Business of the Theatre, Actors' Equity Association, New York, 1932, and Edith J. R. Isaacs, The Negro in the American Theatre, Theatre Arts Books, New York, 1947.

Local histories provide much more detail. Since New York City from very early times played an important part in American theatre, the most useful is G. C. D. Odell Annals of the New York Stage, 15 vols., Columbia University Press, New York, 1927- 1949. They provide a day-by-day account through the season 1893-1894 and have largely supplanted Joseph N. Ireland, Records of the New York Stage, 2 vols., T. H. Morrell, New York, 1866, and T. Allston Brown , History of the New York Stage, 3 vols., Dodd, Mead & Company, Inc., New York, 1903. Charles Blake, An Historical Account of the Providence Stage, G. H. Whitney, Providence, R.I., 1868, is extended by George O.Willard

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