Ecological Approaches to Cognition: Essays in Honor of Ulric Neisser

By Eugene Winograd; Robyn Fivush et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
Unity and Diversity in Knowledge

Elizabeth Spelke Masschusetts Institue of Technology

At the center of the extraordinary work that Ulric Neisser has so far accomplished is, I believe, a creative tension. On one hand, Neisser is a synthesizer and a unifier, who aims to forge an integrated art and science of cognition. Cognition, as Neisser studies it, cannot be a collection of isolated facts and curiosities; it must be an interconnected system of general principles and common themes. These themes should allow one to see connections between processes as diverse as reaching for objects, identifying faces or words, charting courses through the layout, reminiscing about one's childhood, dreaming, imagining, and arriving at solutions to problems. Neisser's first great step toward this unification--distilled in his book Cognitive Psychology ( 1967)--inaugurated a field. His second step-- Cognition and Reality ( 1976), a work at the center of my own intellectual foundations--is an agenda--setting effort to orient the study of human knowledge toward the meaningful problems that perceivers, thinkers, and actors encounter.

On the other hand, the cognitive psychology that Neisser portrayed in those books, and has pursued with ever increasing depth and intensity, focuses on particular cognitive problems and phenomena in all their complexity. Neisser's explorations of different regions of the cognitive landscape--pattern recognition, layout perception, attention, imagery, memory, concepts, the self--are models of how to conduct meticulous, detailed, ecologically oriented studies of rich and complex cognitive phenomena. One cannot hope to understand the mind, Neisser urges, by searching,

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ecological Approaches to Cognition: Essays in Honor of Ulric Neisser
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 382

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.