Juvenile Delinquents Grown Up

By Glueck Sheldon; Eleanor Glueck | Go to book overview

AUTHORS' PREFACE

OUR first study of juvenile delinquents, published in 1934, reported what had happened to a thousand boys during a five- year period immediately following "treatment" for a specific offense for which they had been brought before a juvenile court.1 At that time there was no plan for following their careers further, but the interest aroused by the report, and the fact that it was of use to those concerned with the problems of delinquency, suggested that valuable additional information might be obtained if the behavior of the boys were studied during another ten years, at the end of which time most of them would be grown up. The generosity of the Commonwealth Fund has made this follow-up possible.

We cannot list in detail all the individuals, institutions, and public and private welfare agencies in Massachusetts and in other states who have assisted us in one way or another in this work, and without whose ready cooperation it would have been impossible for us to carry through this research. We must, however, particularly mention Dr. William A. Healy and Dr. Augusta Bronner of the Judge Baker Guidance Center of Boston; Mr. Roscoe C. Hill and Miss Carrie V. Moyer of the Bureau of Criminal Identification of the Massachusetts Department of Public Safety; Miss Laura G. Woodberry of the Boston Social Service Index, whose files were consulted for information about the contacts of social agencies with our youths and their families; Hon. Albert Carter, Commissioner of Probation of Massachusetts, who, like his predecessor, Mr. Herbert C. Parsons, facilitated the clearance of our cases through the files of the Board of Probation, where the criminal records of offenders committing crimes in Massachusetts are centralized; Hon. Arthur T. Lyman, Commissioner of Correction of Massachusetts, who permitted us to consult records in the files of the department; Mr. Richard Winslow, until recently Director of the Personnel De

____________________
1
Sheldon and Eleanor T. Glueck, One Thousand Juvenile Delinquents, Volume I of Harvard Law School Survey of Crime and Criminal Justice in Boston, Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1934.

-vii-

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