Juvenile Delinquents Grown Up

By Glueck Sheldon; Eleanor Glueck | Go to book overview

Chapter VI
DELINQUENCY IN THIRD FOLLOW-UP PERIOD

WE have seen that the second five-year period beyond the completion of treatment by the Boston Juvenile Court and associated agencies was marked by an appreciable improvement in the conduct of the youths. Does this continue?

By the end of the third five-year follow-up period death had taken 21 more of the original army of 1,000, in addition to the 39 who had previously passed away.1 By the end of this third follow-up period the average age of the remaining 940 young men was twenty-nine years (±.06), the age distribution being: 9 per cent between twenty-one and twenty-five, 62 per cent between twenty-six and thirty, 28.7 per cent between thirty-one and thirty-five, and two men between thirty-six and forty.

In addition to the 60 youths who have died, we must eliminate from further consideration two youths because of incarceration in non-penal institutions during practically all the third five-year span. We are therefore concerned from this point on with the behavior of 938 men.


NUMBER AND NATURE OF ARRESTS

Despite considerable investigation, it is unknown whether 92 of these 938 young men were apprehended during the third five-year follow-up period. Of the 846 whose behavior could be determined, 42.1 per cent were not arrested at all. Of 490 men arrested, 23.7 per cent were apprehended once, 17.3 per cent twice, 12.7 per cent three times, 12.5 per cent four times, 12.7 per cent five or six times, and 21.1 per cent seven or more times. The average number of arrests was 3.78 (±.07).2

These offenders were apprehended 2,195 times, and the reasons for their arrests could be determined in 2,146 instances. Almost a fifth (18.2 per cent) were for property crimes, 22.5 per cent for

____________________
1
For causa of death, see Appendix B, 4.
2
Appendix B, 59.

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Juvenile Delinquents Grown Up
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.