Juvenile Delinquents Grown Up

By Glueck Sheldon; Eleanor Glueck | Go to book overview

Chapter XIII
BEHAVIOR DURING VARIOUS FORMS OF PENO- CORRECTIONAL TREATMENT

THUS far we have given no particular attention to the conduct of our juvenile offenders during the various peno-correctional treatments which they experienced. Nor have we in our previous researches particularly studied the behavior of criminals during treatment. We know, however, that some offenders react differently during some forms of peno-correctional treatment than during others. In 500 Criminal Careers, for example, we noted that, although 30 per cent of the ex-inmates of the Massachusetts Reformatory were non-criminal during parole supervision, a lower proportion, 21.1 per cent, were non-criminal during a five-year period following the end of parole.1 We also noted in that work that 17.5 per cent of the group did not violate any of the institution's rules and were in other ways "model prisoners"; but the remainder, 82.5 per cent, were in varying degrees not amenable to the institutional regime. Some 86 per cent of those who misbehaved committed serious offenses in the institution, such as rebellion against authority, violence against the person, offenses against property, and sex offenses; while about 13 per cent could be designated minor offenders.2 We further noted in our more intensive studies of individual delinquents that particular offenders, although behaving very well in a reformatory, misbehaved during periods of probation or parole; and that other offenders did not respond well either in institutions or during periods of extramural treatment.

We observed that some offenders who underwent frequent periods of institutionalization responded very poorly in their earlier years but later grew more amenable to institutional regimes. We also noted in previous researches, as well as the present one, that

____________________
1
500 Criminal Careers, table 16, page 190.
2
500 Criminal Careers, pages 158-159, 163.

-147-

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