Juvenile Delinquents Grown Up

By Glueck Sheldon; Eleanor Glueck | Go to book overview

Chapter XVII
OFFENDERS WHO SUCCEEDED DURING INTRAMURAL TREATMENT AND THOSE WHO SUCCEEDED DURING BOTH FORMS OF TREATMENT

IN our search for the reasons why certain offenders did not behave satisfactorily except behind walls, we now turn to a comparison of this group (214 cases) with the offenders who succeeded at least at times during both supervised freedom and while in peno-correctional institutions (209 cases).


RESEMBLANCES

The two groups of offenders we are considering here--those who succeeded only during intramural treatment and those who succeeded during both extramural and intramural--resembled each other in a number of ways. First, in family background: the boys were of like nativity; the average age of the younger of their parents at the time of marriage was the same, as was the average difference in age between the younger and older of their parents; the families of the two groups were of equal size, they had a like history of mental disease and/or defect, and they were to an equal extent aided by social agencies during the boyhood of our offenders.

Also, certain characteristics of the boys themselves were similar. At the time they were examined at the Clinic of the Judge Baker Foundation the two groups were in about the same condition of health, and an equal incidence of mental disease or distortion or of personality liabilities was discovered among them. They were in equal measure retarded in school. They were of the same average age when they began to work, and they engaged in the same types of occupation. During boyhood they were to an equal extent members of gangs or street crowds of boys, and similar proportions of

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