Juvenile Delinquents Grown Up

By Glueck Sheldon; Eleanor Glueck | Go to book overview

Chapter XIX
PREDICTING BEHAVIOR DURING VARIOUS FORMS OF PENO-CORRECTIONAL TREATMENT

IN our analyses of the "conduct types" we discovered several clues to the reasons why certain offenders do not respond to certain types of peno-correctional treatment. Our next step is to use this information in such a way that a judge, knowing certain facts about the background and personal characteristics of a prisoner brought before him for sentencing, will be helped in deciding which of the various forms of peno-correctional treatment is likely to produce the best results. For example, we found that offenders who did not like companionship did not behave as well in institutions as on probation or parole; special provision should be made for such offenders to insure more individualized attention than is ordinarily given in institutions. We also found that certain youths who were victims of deep feelings of insecurity engendered by their early environment behaved well in institutions but not during extramural supervision; probation and parole authorities should be guided by this finding in giving closer and more sympathetic supervision to such offenders if it is necessary to place them on probation or parole.

If it is possible to determine to which kind of peno-correctional treatment a particular offender is most likely to respond, and so to subject him only to treatments which will increase his capacity for adjustment and thereby his responsiveness to treatment, the peno- correctional system can be made to function much more smoothly-- and to the ultimate advantage of the public as well as the offender.

In our previous works our prediction tables dealt only with the probable behavior of offenders following the completion of a particular form of treatment; in 500 Criminal Careers and in Later Criminal Careers with behavior after treatment in a men's reformatory, in Five Hundred Delinquent Women with behavior after treatment in a women's reformatory, and in One Thousand Juvenile Delinquents

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