Individual and Group Decision Making: Current Issues

By N. John Castellan Jr. | Go to book overview

tion forms. Free discussion leads to consensus about a group policy. The procedure used by Pritchard et al. ( 1988, 1989) and Sawyer et al. ( 1991; see Pritchard , 1990, for a general discussion of the procedure) was to directly obtain judgments of contingency functions as described previously.

The extent to which this method provides group policies regarding the contingencies relating performance dimensions (cues) to overall evaluations that are comparable to the social judgment approach is an empirical question for which further research is planned.


SUMMARY

In this chapter single-cue covariation judgments have been defined and the SJT approach to studying covariation judgments was reviewed. The research presented on covariation judgments was intended to be illustrative rather than comprehensive. The primary goals of this chapter were to (a) identify consistent biases in the judgment and use of nonlinear covariation rules and (b) discuss an application of covariation judgment to organizational behavior.

Biases in the judgment and use of covariation rules stem from uncertainty in the covariation context and are consistent with findings regarding responses to uncertainty in other decision contexts such as Prospect Theory ( Kahneman & Tversky, 1979). Descriptive models of decision-making utilizing covariation judgments should take into account these uncertainty-oriented biases.

An application of covariation judgment to organizational behavior was discussed. It was proposed that covariation judgments be used in a normative fashion to guide behavior in a work setting. Research attempting to develop an application of covariation judgment to a normative model of performance assessment and feedback was presented.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Preparation of this chapter began while I was at Texas A&M University. Partial support for the preparation of this manuscript was provided by a grant from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Advanced Research Program, Project #010366-098.


REFERENCES

Balzer W. K., Doherty M. E., & O'Connor R., Jr. ( 1989). "Effects of cognitive feedback on performance". Psychological Bulletin, 106, 410-433.

Brehmer B. ( 1973). "Effects of task predictability and cue validity on interpersonal learning of inference tasks involving both linear and nonlinear relations". Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 10, 220-227.

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