Individual and Group Decision Making: Current Issues

By N. John Castellan Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 15
NATURALISTIC GROUP DECISION MAKING: OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY

William C. McDaniel

Formerly with

Naval Personnel Research and Development Center,

San Diego, CA

To provide a structure to my remarks concerning the previously presented research in naturalistic group decision making, I am reminded of a rather pejorative story about attorneys. The story seems appropriate and relevant to decision-making research; however, if I fail to communicate this relevancy, I hope you will at least enjoy the story.

It seems there were two psychologists who were hot air balloon enthusiasts. One morning soon after they had launched, a fierce storm came up. Through downdrafts, updrafts, and severe crosswinds, they managed to remain aloft. However, due to fog, rain, and clouds that obscured the ground, after about an hour they were completely lost. Finally, through a break in the clouds, they could see the ground and a man standing in a clearing. The two balloonists descended and one of them shouted, "Where are we?"

The man on the ground replied, "You're in a balloon."

Perplexed, frustrated, and more than a little confused, the balloonists looked at each other. Finally, one spoke: "What did he say?"

The other answered, "He must be a lawyer--What he said made a lot of sense, but I don't think he told us a damn thing."


WHERE ARE WE?

On July 3, 1988, Iran Air Flight 665 took off from Bandar Abbas Airport and headed across the Persian Gulf enroute to Dubai. Seven minutes into its flight, Captain William Rogers of the USS VINCENNES, judging the airliner to be

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