Kant's Theory of Knowledge: An Outline of One Central Argument in the Critique of Pure Reason

By Graham Bird | Go to book overview

3
TRANSCENDENTAL AND EMPIRICAL

'All this clearly points to the conclusion that transcendental questions allow only of transcendental answers . . .' (B 665).

IT has been already suggested (Ch. 1, p. 16) that the distinction between transcendental and empirical bears directly on Kant's aim in the Deduction; and many commentators have recognised the importance of this distinction in the Critique. One of the earliest, Mellin, understood Kant to mean that the objects said to affect our senses do so in a dual way. On his view Kant thought that although these objects were themselves empirical, yet they had an effect both upon our empirical and our transcendental sensibility. Much more recently a similar position was reached by Adickes, who suggested a complex 'double affection' between appearances and things in themselves on one side and empirical and noumenal selves on the other. Such views are more simply illustrated by diagrams such as those which appear in Kemp Smith Commentary (p. 281) or Weldon Kant's Critique of Pure Reason ( 2nd ed., p. 253). Yet such diagrams presuppose that the objects drawn in them can be easily distinguished, when in reality nobody has been able to give a clear and unobjectionable sense to the notions of a transcendental object or a transcendental self.

There is at least one passage in Kant's writings where he notices and firmly rejects duplications of entities in this way. At the time when he was writing the Prolegomena he criticised Berkeley for needlessly duplicating mental phenomena, by bringing them into relation both with appearances and things in themselves. He said

-36-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kant's Theory of Knowledge: An Outline of One Central Argument in the Critique of Pure Reason
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • I - Phenomena And Phenomenalism 1
  • 2 - Noumena And Noumenalism 18
  • 3 - Transcendental And Empirical 36
  • 4 - Sensibility And Understanding 52
  • 5 - Intelligible Objects 65
  • 6 - The Transcendental Analytic 82
  • 7 - Categories And Judgments 91
  • (i) Introduction 110
  • 9 - The Transcendental Deduction (continued) 126
  • 10 - The First and Second Analogies 149
  • II - Personality 168
  • 12 - The Transition To Moral Philosophy 189
  • List of Books 205
  • Index 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.