Human Factors in Intelligent Transportation Systems

By Woodrow Barfield; Thomas A. Dingus | Go to book overview

TABLE 2.3
A Summary of Knowledge and Attitude Cognitive Characteristics and Related Information Requirements
Cognitive CharacteristicsInformation Requirements
Hierarchical organization of navigation Provide information in a form that is
knowledge compatible with knowledge structure.
Different levels of navigation expertise Provide people with navigation information
tailored to the expertise.
Limited knowledge, even with experts Provide an accurate representation of street
network information.
Tendency toward overly simplistic mental Make appropriate mental models apparent
models
in the interface or through the use of
analogies.
Potential for inaccurate models Make appropriate mental models apparent
in interface or through the use of analogies.
Reliance on analogies to understand systems Describe ATIS functions and features using
analogies that provide a complete and
veridical description of the system.
Trust Convey an accurate reflection of system
performance, mechanisms that guide
system, and purpose of system.
Self-confidence Convey an accurate reflection of driver
performance.

categories: perception and action, information assimilation and decision making, and knowledge and attitudes.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

This research was supported by the Federal Highway Administration Contract DTFH1-92-C-00102.


SUGGESTED READINGS

Michon J. A. ( 1993). Generic intelligent driver support: A comprehensive report on GIDS. Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis.

Parkes A. M., & Franzen S. ( 1993). Driving future vehicles. Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis.


REFERENCES

Allen R. W., Ziedman D., Rosenthal T. J., Torres J., & Halati A. ( 1991). Laboratory assessment of driver route diversion in response to in-vehicle navigation and motorist information systems. In SAE Technical Paper Series (SAE No. 910701, pp. 1-25). Warrendale, PA: Society of Automotive Engineers.

Ashby W. R. ( 1956). Introduction to cybernetics. London: Chapman & Hall.

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