Democratizing Sir Thomas Browne: Religio Medici and Its Imitations

By Daniela Havenstein | Go to book overview

'Suicide' and Other Words in Religio Medici and its Imitations

Our best modern Authors, who have both infinitely enriched and enobled our Language, by admitting and naturalizing thousands of foraign Words, providently brought home from the Greek, Roman, and French Oratories; which though, in the untravel'd ears of our Fathers, would have sounded harsh, yet a few late years have rendred them familiar even to vulgar capacities. Witness the learned Works of the Lord Bacon, Mr. Montague, Sir Kenelm Digby, Sir Henry Wotton, Mr. Selden, Mr. Sands, Dr. Brown, Dr. Charleton, Dr. Heylyn, Mr. Howel &c.1

Fortunately, Thomas Blount's acknowledgement of Browne is not limited to this reference in his 'To the Reader'. Among the seventeenth-century 'dictionaries'2 his Glossographia is unique in that it often provides its readers with Blount's source (the name of an author, the title of a work, or both) after the entry of a particular word.3 Blount supplies an explanation for his own practice: 'that I might not be thought to be the innovator of them [the words]'.4 The implications lurking behind this obliging statement will be discussed later. Here it suffices to emphasize the contemporary lexicographer's interest in Browne as an innovator of words and as a 'naturalizer' of recently introduced words.5 A complete scan of Glossographia demonstrates the extent of Blount's debt to Browne. I count about two hundred explicit references to Browne, the vast majority of them from Vulgar Errors. This interest in Browne is reiterated by Edward

____________________
1
Thomas Blount, Glossographia ( London, 1656), 'To the Reader,' sig. A4.
2
I am referring to the 'all-English', 'hard-word' dictionaries here.
3
Blount employs various abbreviations when referring to Browne and his works: Br., Dr. Br. (occasionally in full: Dr. Brown), Vul. Er., (Vulgar Er.), Rel. Med.
4
Glossographia, 'To the Reader'.
5
N. E. Osselton provides further evidence for the lexicographers' interest in Browne. He points out that Willem Sewel illustrates one of the meanings of 'inform' by using an example from Religio Medici in the second edition of his New Dictionary English and Dutch ( 1708). N. E. Osselton, The Dumb Linguists: A Study of the Earliest English and Dutch Dictionaries ( London, 1973), 62.

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Democratizing Sir Thomas Browne: Religio Medici and Its Imitations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • OXFORD ENGLISH MONOGRAPHS i
  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Tables x
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Preamble 1
  • Religio Writing in the Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Centuries 5
  • 2 - Religio Medici and the Restoration Virtuoso 27
  • 3 - Religio Medici and Grubstreet 45
  • 4 - Religio Medici and Newgate 71
  • 5 - The Resurrection of Morris W. Croll 88
  • 6 - Anatomizing Croll and Religio Medici 104
  • 7 - Anatomizing Religio Medici's Imitations 129
  • 8 - Searching for the Limbs of Osiris 149
  • 'suicide' and Other Words in Religio Medici and Its Imitations 173
  • Conclusion 198
  • Appendix: Tables of Word-Classes 205
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 236

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.