Public Policy and the Public Good

By Ethan Fishman | Go to book overview

their own political claims. As far as aboriginal land claims are concerned, they find the terrain unfavorable: Locke's labor theory of property rights clearly favors the European newcomers. The main recourse for native advocates here would be to argue that, even if a Lockean theory of property is logically consistent, it does not actually apply to the historical situation in North America because Indians were already agricultural peoples, much land was unsuited to agriculture, and so on. Locke is more useful to natives on the issue of self-government, for his doctrine of consent seems to reinforce their claim to sovereignty. Since Locke's teaching on consent has long been criticized as confusing and inconsistent, this is further cause to reconsider whether consent can properly be construed as the basis of legitimacy.

None of this tells us what public policy toward natives should be, whether and in what ways the polity should recognize their claims for land and self-government. But it does help us understand the terms in which these claims are expressed as well as their complex interconnection with larger themes in the public philosophy. In the exercise of practical wisdom, statesmen can draw on this understanding in trying to arrive at a modus vivendi between natives and other members of the polity.


REFERENCES

Barsh Russell Lawrence, and Henderson James Youngblood. 1980. The Road: Indian Tribes and Political Liberty. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Dunn John. 1969. The Political Thought of John Locke. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Flanagan Thomas. 1989. "The Agricultural Argument and Original Appropriation: Indian Lands and Political Philosophy." Canadian Journal of Political Science 22: 589-602.

Forbes H. D. 1987. "Hartz-Horowitz at Twenty: Nationalism, Toryism, and Socialism in Canada and the United States." Canadian Journal of Political Science 20: 287-316.

Gauthier David. 1979. "Review of Contemporary Issues in Political Philosophy." Dialogue 18: 432-40.

Gerth H. H., and Mills C. Wright. 1958. From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology. New York: Oxford University Press.

Green L. C., and Dickason Olive P. 1989. The Law of Nations and the New World. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press.

Griffin Nicholas. 1981. "Aboriginal Rights: Gauthier's Argument for Despoilation [sic]." Dialogue 20: 690-96.

Hartz Louis. 1955. The Liberal Tradition in America: An Interpretation of American Political Thought Since the Revolution. New York: Harcourt, Brace, and World.

Hume David. 1985. "Of the Original Contract" [ 1748]. In Essays Moral, Political, and Literary. Indianapolis: Liberty Classics.

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Public Policy and the Public Good
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1: The Rabbi and the Fig Tree: A Lesson for the Supreme Court on Capital Punishment 1
  • References 12
  • 2 - Plato and the Media 15
  • References 27
  • 3 - The Tide Just Keeps Rising: An Aristotelian Perspective on the Crisis in American Education 29
  • References 44
  • 4 - Aquinas, Prudence, and Health Care Policy 47
  • Notes 60
  • Notes 61
  • 5: Martin Luther on Political Leadership 63
  • References 78
  • 6 - A Hobbesian Analysis of the Dangers of Interest-Group Liberalism 81
  • Notes 95
  • 7 - Native Peoples and Lockean Philosophy: Land Claims and Self-Government 97
  • References 109
  • 8: The Republican Tradition and Affirmative Action 111
  • References 125
  • 9 - Surrogate Motherhood: Contract, Gender, and Liberal Politics 127
  • Notes 141
  • References 141
  • 10 - Marx and the Computer 143
  • References 153
  • Selected Bibliography 157
  • Index 161
  • About the Contributors 165
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