International Handbook on Social Work Education

By Thomas D. Watts; Doreen Elliott et al. | Go to book overview

3
MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA

Marian A. Aguilar


INTRODUCTION

The literature related to social work education in Central America in the English language is very sparse. While material in Spanish is available in a few libraries, the publications are limited and are not current. Even travel to Central America to obtain data does not guarantee access to recent information. Most developing countries do not have the resources to maintain and upgrade their data collection methods and publications. The professionalization of social work education in Mexico and Central America has enhanced the social development of these countries. Although professional social workers have contributed to changes in the social order through their practice, little is known of their work.

The purpose of this chapter is to add to our knowledge of social work education in the developing countries of Mexico and Central America. The chapter focuses on Mexico and secondarily on the Central American countries of Costa Rica, Honduras, Panama, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala. The chapter includes information on the historical development of social work as an academic discipline; the influence of culture, values and religion on social work education; the structure and range of social programs; the client groups served; the form of program funding; the training qualifications, the evaluation process used for gatekeeping; the role of the political climate and government in the profession, the curriculum decision makers; and the role of research.


HISTORY OF SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION

The early origins of social work education in Mexico and Central America can be viewed in the context of the historical development of Latin America. It began in Latin America with the founding of the first school, Alejandro Del Rio, in Chile, which based its curricular structure on the European model of that era ( Torres Diaz, 1987).

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International Handbook on Social Work Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page III
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables and Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Foreword xiii
  • AN INTRODUCTION TO THE WORLD OF SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION 1
  • References 5
  • I NORTH AMERICA AND SOUTH AMERICA 7
  • 1: UNITED STATES 7B
  • 2: CANADA 23
  • Conclusion 40
  • Notes 40
  • 3: MEXICO and CENTRAL AMERICA 43
  • SUMMARY 62
  • References 62
  • 4: SOUTH AMERICA 65
  • Conclusion 82
  • References 83
  • 5: ARGENTINA 87
  • II EUROPE 102a
  • 6: EUROPE 103
  • 7: UNITED KINGDOM 123
  • 8: SWEDEN 145
  • 9: FRANCE 161
  • References 174
  • 10: GERMANY Hans-Jochen Brauns and David Kramer 177
  • 11: CENTRAL and EASTERN EUROPE 191
  • Conclusion 207
  • References 208
  • 12: RUSSIA and THE REPUBLICS 211
  • III AFRICA 222A
  • 13: AFRICA 223
  • 14: ZIMBABWE 241
  • Conclusion 257
  • References 257
  • 15: SOUTH AFRICA 261
  • References 278
  • IV MIDDLE EAST 280A
  • 16: MIDDLE EAST and EGYPT 281
  • References 302
  • References 303
  • 17: ISRAEL 305
  • V ASIA AND THE PACIFIC 320A
  • 18: ASIA and THE PACIFIC 321
  • 19: AUSTRALIA 339
  • References 352
  • 20: INDIA 355
  • Notes 364
  • References 364
  • 21: BANGLADESH 367
  • 22: JAPAN 389
  • 23: CHINA 403
  • Notes 417
  • References 418
  • VI OVERVIEW 420A
  • 24: COMPARATIVE and INTERNATIONAL OVERVIEW 421
  • Introduction 421
  • Index 441
  • ABOUT THE EDITORS AND CONTRIBUTORS 451
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