Working the Range: Essays on the History of Western Land Management and the Environment

By John R. Wunder | Go to book overview

Navajo would have soon attempted an escape en masse, as did other Indian groups. If so, the Treaty of 1868 saved the Navajo from the fate which met the Nez Percé, Comanche, and other Indian nations. Thus, the Navajo were able to begin a new, more prosperous life in their regained ancestral home.


NOTES
1.
U.S., Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1866, p. 135.
2.
Lynn R. Bailey, The Long Walk: A History of the Navajo Wars, 1846-1968 ( Los Angeles: Westernlore Press, 1964), pp. 2-3.
3.
Gerald E. Thompson, ed., "'To the People of New Mexico': General Carleton Defends the Bosque Redondo," Arizona and the West 14 (Winter 1972):349.
4.
Ibid.
5.
"Governor's Message to the Territorial Legislature of New Mexico, December 6, 1864," in U.S. Department of State Territorial Papers, New Mexico, 1851- 1972, Record Group 59, National Archives Microfilm Publications, Washington D.C., microcopy no. T17, roll 3.
6.
Thompson, "'To the People of New Mexico,'" p. 349; Frank McNitt, "Fort Sumner: A Study in Origins," New Mexico Historical Review 45 ( April 1970): 102, 107-111.
7.
"Letter from the Secretary of War relative to the unsuitableness of the Bosque Redondo Reservation in New Mexico for the location of the Navajo Indians," House Exec. Doc. 248, 40th Cong., 2d sess.
8.
U.S., Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1866, pp. 146, 150; U.S., Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1867, p. 190.
9.
Lynn R. Bailey, Bosque Redondo: An American Concentration Camp ( Pasadena: Socio-Technical Books, 1970), p. 117.
10.
The report of the Doolittle Committee was read before Congress on January 26, 1867, Congressional Globe, 39th Cong., 2d sess., 1867, p. 763.

-36-

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