Working the Range: Essays on the History of Western Land Management and the Environment

By John R. Wunder | Go to book overview

but the part of modern political operators, seeking the fulfillment of their political interests in combination with other interests that approximated theirs and with whom they would negotiate as virtual equals.


NOTES
1.
For general appraisals of the political situation of the middle colonies, see Douglas Greenberg, "The Middle Colonies in Recent American Historiography," William and Mary Quarterly 36, 3d ser. ( 1979): 396-427; and Patricia U. Bonomi, "The Middle Colonies: Embryo of the New Political Order," in Perspectives on Early American History: Essays in Honor of Richard B. Morris, ed. Alden T. Vaughan and George Athan Billias ( New York: Harper and Row, 1973), pp. 63-92.
2.
Rowland Berthoff and John M. Murrin, in "Feudalism, Communialism, and the Yeoman Freeholder: The American Revolution Considered as a Social Accident," in Essays on the American Revolution, ed. Stephen G. Kurtz and James H. Hutson ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1973), pp. 271-272, admit that the concept of feudalism that they employ is "grossly imperfect," and make more of the economic gains that the great landholders made in the eighteenth century than they do of the political privileges the landholders enjoyed, but they do specifically mention, without analysis, the proprietors of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The concept is utilized by Edward Countryman in "'Out of the Bounds of the Law': Northern Land Rioters in the Eighteenth Century," in The American Revolution: Explorations in the History of American Radicalism, ed. Alfred F. Young (Dekalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1976), p. 42, but no other historian has taken up this matter.
3.
Patricia U. Bonomi, A Factious People: Politics and Society in Colonial New York ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1971), p. 187, provides a map outlining the location and approximate extent of the great manors and patents. Acreage figures are from Irving Mark, Agrarian Conflicts in ColonialNew York, 1711-1755

-75-

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