German Resistance against Hitler: The Search for Allies Abroad, 1938-1945

By Klemens Von Klemperer | Go to book overview

resistance. His was obviously an extreme case of a German general officer placing himself in a position of serving the 'enemy' in order to accomplish his patriotic objectives. Also, if exiles are identified as having served from abroad as auxiliaries of the Resistance, Seydlitz and his men also should be recognized as having been part of the German Resistance. Undoubtedly they perceived themselves as resisters who, thoroughly abused by their Führer, were hoping to spare the rest of the German soldiers on the Eastern front and the German people at large the fate of the Sixth Army. 222

We simply have to be prepared, as Alexander Fischer put it, to 'broaden the spectrum' 223 of the military arm of the German Resistance. In this case, of course, a reversal of roles had taken place since for once the initiative went out from the captive officers and soldiers abroad attempting to sway the commanders in the field and at home. But, as so often before, the Wehrmacht generals did not choose to act. This time round they may have had better reasons for not doing so for, alas, the sponsors of their comrades in captivity, the Soviets, were plainly not in earnest.


CHAPTER 4
1.
"'The Nature of the Beast'", 14 Mar. 1940, FO 371/24389/C 4229/6/18; the memorandum was actually occasioned by Vansittart's concerns about the mission of Sumner Welles who, by favouring disarmament of the belligerents as a precondition for the return of confidence, so Vansittart argued, was putting the cart before the horse. As a matter of fact, Goerdeler's 'representative' in the USA, Gotthilf Bronisch, reportedly interpreted the Welles stop-over in Berlin as ostensibly only intending to take stock of the overall situation but in reality having been designed to get in touch with the anti-Hitler forces in Germany; Frank Ashton- Gwatkin to Sir Alexander Cadogan, 25 Mar. 1940; FO 371/24407/C 5287/89/18; minuted by G. P. Young from the FO Central Department, not without reason: 'This is typical for the Goerdeler-Schairer clique that they regard any international development as centring around themselves.'
2.
Anthony Glees, Exile Politics during the Second World War: The German Social Democrats in Britain ( Oxford, 1982), 51.
3.
Letters from Hugh Dalton to Lord Halifax and Clement Attlee 2 July 1940, Dalton Papers, quoted in David Stafford, "'The Detonator Concept: British Strategy, SOE and European Resistance After the Fall of France'", Journal of Contemporary History, 10 ( Apr. 1975), 200.
4.
The disillusioned Captain Hans Ritter wrote to Group Captain Christie on 15 Apr. 1940: 'The "Generals" have confirmed my previous assessment of these gentlemen. While they have used the good Herr Tell [Gessler] and Uncle J. [Wirth] to throw sand into your eyes, they cheerfully prepared the invasion of Norway and Denmark . . . I am deeply ashamed of ever having worn the same uniform which these gangsters now soil. Pfui Teufel!'; Letter from Johnny to Lieber Freund Grahame, 15 Apr. 1940, Christie Papers, CHRS 180/1/35.
5.
Lothar Kettenacker, "'Die britische Haltung'", in Lothar Kettenacker (ed.), Das 'Andere Deutschland' im Zweiten Weltkrieg ( Stuttgart, 1977), 59.
6.
Michael Balfour, Propaganda in War 1939-1945 ( London, 1979), 167-70.
7.
WM 213 (40) 26 July 1940, CAB 65/18.
8.
W.S.C. to Vansittart, 7 Jan. 1941; PREM 4/23/2.
9.
Secret 'Summary of Principal Peace Feelers September 1939-March 1941', FO 371/26542/C 4216/610/G.
10.
Since 23 Dec. 1940.
11.
FO 371/26542/C 610/324/P.
12.
Entry of 29 May 1940, Die Hassell-Tagebücher, 195.

-250-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
German Resistance against Hitler: The Search for Allies Abroad, 1938-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • List of Illustrations xiv
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Introduction 13
  • I - Resistance and Exile 19
  • CHAPTER 1 65
  • 2 - Thinking for the British Empire? 82
  • CHAPTER 2 134
  • 3 - 'Make a Revolution in Germany for the German People'? 154
  • CHAPTER 3 198
  • 4 - Widerstand and the Forging of the Grand Alliance 217
  • CHAPTER 4 250
  • 5 - Ecumenical Dialogue or 'the War Behind the War' 264
  • CHAPTER 5 298
  • 6 - The Vision and the Mirage 315
  • CHAPTER 6 396
  • Conclusion 432
  • Conclusion 440
  • Bibliography 442
  • Index 473
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 488

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.