Auxiliary Police: The Citizen's Approach to Public Safety

By Martin Alan Greenberg | Go to book overview

18
The ROTC Police Corps Plan

On August 4, 1982, a private study group, headed by New York attorney Adam Walinsky, proposed the establishment of "The New Police Corps." Walinsky was at one time a top aide to Senator Robert Kennedy and was a former chairman of the New York State Commission of Investigation. The other members of the panel that produced the proposal were: Jan Deutsch, professor of law at Yale University and a former staff member of the President's Commission on Crime and Violence; Lawrence Kurlander, the director of the New York State Office of Criminal Justice under Governor Cuomo and the former district attorney of Monroe County, New York; Monroe Price, dean of the Benjamin A. Cardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University; Jonathan Rubinstein, research director of the Center for Research on Institutions and Social Policy and the author of City Police; Neil Welch, the former assistant director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and secretary of justice for the State of Kentucky; and Jane Walinsky, a New York attorney, who served as research assistant. 1

The group's proposal is based on the military's Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program that provides college tuition assistance and other benefits in exchange for an obligation to perform military service after graduation. The group believes that additional police must be made available to communities throughout the State of New York and especially within New York City. The plan envisions the availability of 30,000 extra police officers during the next six to eight years. This number could result in a doubling of the police presence in every area of the state with a serious crime problem. The panel recommends that 20,000 police corps officers be assigned to the New York City Police Department, 7,000 to other suburban forces and 3,000 to rural communities. 2

The police corps proposal is being studied by governmental committees and civic groups in New York, California, Florida and Maryland. 3 In addition, the police chiefs of San Diego, Atlanta and Minneapolis expressed interest in the proposal in 1982. It was also given a major endorsement by Bart Giamatti, the president of Yale University, who was planning to organize academic support for the project. 4 Editorial praise for the concept appeared in the New York Times and in New York magazine. 5 Moreover, John Keenan, New York City's crim-

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Auxiliary Police: The Citizen's Approach to Public Safety
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent titles in Criminology and Penology ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • • Introduction 3
  • Part I - POLICE HISTORY AND THE VOLUNTEER 11
  • 1 - The Early History of Law Enforcement 13
  • 2 - The Early History of New York City's Police 25
  • 3 - Vigilantism and the Police 39
  • Part II - HISTORY OF NEW YORK'S VOLUNTEER POLICE 47
  • 4 - The Citizens Home Defense League 49
  • 5 - The New York Police Reserves 53
  • 6 - The New York City Patrol Corps 61
  • 7 - The Civil Defense Auxiliary Police 69
  • 8 - The Auxiliary Patrol Force 81
  • 9 - City in Crisis 89
  • 10 - Auxiliary Police in Crisis 95
  • 11 - The Auxiliary Peacekeeping Force 99
  • 12 - The Total Force Concept 103
  • Part III - CURRENT ISSUES IN VOLUNTEER POLICING 109
  • 13 - The Auxiliary Police and the Law 111
  • 14 - Power in the Auxiliary Police 119
  • 15 - The Origin of the Auxiliary Subway Patrol 125
  • 16 - Report on New York City's Auxiliary Police 131
  • 17 - The Guardian Angels 147
  • 18 - The Rotc Police Corps Plan 155
  • 19 - Conclusion 163
  • APPENDICES 169
  • Appendix C The Case of the People v. Robert Jackson 183
  • Notes 189
  • • Bibliography 217
  • Index 225
  • About the Author 233
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