International Organizations: A Comparative Approach

By Werner J. Feld; Robert S. Jordan et al. | Go to book overview

that states external to the region have intervened in various conflicts, and at times, sharp reversals of alliances have taken place as a result. Such external impact can result in a decline in IGO task performance which, in turn, will weaken its solidarity.

It is not yet clear that the African regional or sub-regional IGOs in the post-Cold War era can bring about successfully the resolution of conflicts exascerbated during the Cold War without the assistance of the United Nations. Angola, South Africa, and Liberia are cases in point. The political turmoil in Central America in the 1980s, which was caused in part by conflicting objectives of the U.S. and the Soviet Union has been responsible, to a large degree, for the decline of the Central American Common Market in recent years. As the political atmosphere improved with the demise of the Cold War the chances of revival for a regional organization there have also improved.

Finally, the creation of regional development banks whose memberships are not confined to the region provide examples of how the attraction and accumulation of adequate financial and technological resources, which require exra-regional involvement, can be crucial to the capacity of these IGOs to carry out their development missions.


NOTES
1.
One exception is John Gerard Ruggie, "Collective Goods and Future International Collaboration," American Political Science Review 66 ( September 1972): 874- 93. For a thoughtful examination of the theoretical implications of the post-Cold War international system (if such may be seen as coming into existence), see Seyom Brown , International Relations in a Changing Global System: Toward a Theory of the World Polity ( Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1992).
2.
Ruggie, "Collective Goods," pp. 877-82.
4.
For a discussion of interdependence as viewed in the 1970s from the then Third World, see Guy F. Erb and Valeriana Kallab, eds., Beyond Dependence: The Developing World Speaks Out ( Washington, DC: Overseas Development Council, 1975). For later views on this subject, see Hoyt Purvis, Interdependence: An Introduction to International Relations ( New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers, 1992); and Bruce Russett, Harvey Starr, and Richard Stoll, eds., Choices in World Politics: Sovereignty and Interdependence ( New York: W. H. Freeman, 1989).
5.
Erb and Kallab, Beyond Dependence, p. 882. This proposition is slightly paraphrased.
8.
See Mancur Olson, The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1971), as quoted in Edward Mansfield , "The Concentration of Capabilities and International Trade," International Organization (Summer 1992): 731-63. See also Todd Sandier and John Cauley,

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