International Organizations: A Comparative Approach

By Werner J. Feld; Robert S. Jordan et al. | Go to book overview

building block of the contemporary international political system is challenged.

Global ad hoc conferences, and conferencing in general, as this chapter suggests, have been utilized by INGOs to gain access to IGO decision making. IGO decisions can be viewed as a form of legislative decisionmaking or in some cases international legislation. INGOs, by using networking techniques whereby the activities of national bodies are coordinated at the international level or by forming coalitions at the international level to influence governments or each other, are coming to play an increasingly important role in framing and articulating the issue areas of IGO decision making. In fact, for many issue areas (e.g., those concerned with the environment, population, renewable energy, harnessing science and technology for development, hunger and malnutrition, disease prevention and control, and arms control and disarmament), INGOs are now essential adjuncts of IGOs. Patterns of IGO-INGO cooperation in responding to the needs of these issue areas have led to a heightened interest in the potential of international regimes as a technique of multilateralism that can minimize both the national particularism of IGOs and fears of excessive supranationalism. This point is examined in the following chapter.


NOTES
1.
Werner J. Feld, "The Impact of Nongovernmental Organizations on the Formulation of Transnational Policies," Jerusalem Journal of International Relations 2 (Fall 1976): 8. For an illustration of the interaction of INGOs with IGOs in a post- Cold War conflict, see Larry Minear et al., United Nations Coordination of the International Humanitarian Response to the Gulf Crisis, 1990-1992, Occasional Paper no. 13 ( Brown University, Thomas J. Watson Institute for International Studies, Providence, RI: 1992).
2.
Ibid. The following paragraphs were drawn from Feld, "Transnational Policies," pp. 87-89.
3.
Robert Fenaux, "The Transnational Family of Associations (INGOs) and the New World Order," Transnational Associations 4 ( 1978): 194.
4.
For a fuller description, see Ylter Turkmen, "The Role of the Non-Governmental Organization within the United Nations System," Transnational Associations 2 ( 1978): 81-83. See also the UNITAR Conference Report by Berhanykun Andemicael and Elfan Rees, Non-Governmental Organizations in Economic and Social Development ( New York: United Nations Institute for Training and Research, 1975).
5.
This section is drawn from Johan Kaufmann, United Nations Decision Making ( Rockville, MD: Sitjhoff and Noordhoff, 1980), p. 93.
6.
For background, see Robert S. Jordan, "Why a NIEO? The View from the Third World," in The Emerging International Economic Order: Dynamic Processes, Constraints, and Opportunities, ed. Harold Jacobson and Dusan Sidjanski ( Beverly Hills, CA: Sage, 1982). See also John P. Renninger, ECOSOC: Options for Reforms, Efficacy and Policy Studies no. 4 ( New York: UNITAR, 1981).

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