Corporate Communications: A Comparison of Japanese and American Practices

By William V. Ruch | Go to book overview

3
The Japanese Corporation: Employees

Japan's only natural resource in any abundance is its people so the country goes to great lengths to protect its people. In the past, as we've seen, the Tokugawa shoguns sealed off the country from outside influences. More recently, the government decided to record its history selectively by deleting from history books references to its "acts of aggression" in China and Southeast Asia during World War II. 1

It is doubtful, however, that the government can prevent stories such as those of the atrocities from being passed on, and, as they are, they are distorted, without government interference. When I lived in Japan, schoolchildren who had been born after World War II were asked what about the past they would like to experience if they could. A surprisingly large number said they would like to see the beauties of the fire bombing of the cities during the war. Their elders had told them how enjoyable it had been to stand on a hill or a mountain and watch the fires burning below them! Most of the children had heard the glorified descriptions in their own family groups, which in Japan are very important.

More important than the family group for the Japanese employee, though, is his or her work group. Each individual work group is also very important to a corporation. To be sure a group and all of its members perform well, the Japanese company invests much time and money on good employee relations. In this chapter, we examine group life in the Japanese company and a company's emphasis on employee (human) relations.


GROUPS

From the Tokugawa days of isolated villages whose residents depended on one another for survival, the Japanese have learned to adapt

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Corporate Communications: A Comparison of Japanese and American Practices
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.