Reducing Unemployment: A Case for Government Deregulation

By Garry K. Ottosen; Douglas N. Thompson | Go to book overview

This act would require agencies to assess the costs of their proposed regulations before they are enacted and offset those costs with revocations or revisions of existing regulations. If we are to reduce the unemployment rate that is consistent with stable inflation, the inflation and unemployment costs of government regulations must be well known, actively debated, and considered before legislation is passed and regulations enacted. This book recommends that the currently languishing Regulatory Accountability Act of 1993, which has apparently been stuck in a congressional committee, be quickly enacted. The benefit to our society is a focusing of attention on the employment and inflationary impacts of social regulations.


NOTES
1.
Edmund S. Phelps, Structural Slumps: The Modern Equilibrium Theory of Unemployment, Interest, and Assets ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1994).
2.
Richard Layard, How to Beat Unemployment ( Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 1986), p. 38.
3.
David Vogel, "The 'New' Social Regulation in Historical and Comparative Perspective," in Thomas K. McCraw (ed.), Regulation in Perspective ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1981), pp. 155-86.
4.
Larry N. Gerston, Cynthia Fraleigh, and Robert Schwab, The Deregulated Society (Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole, 1988), pp. 24-25.
6.
Murray L. Weidenbaum, Business, Government, and the Public, 4th ed. ( Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1990), p. 46, Figure 2.2.
7.
Vogel, "The 'New' Social Regulation," p. 161.
9.
Thomas D. Hopkins, "The Costs of Federal Regulation," Policy Analysis ( Washington, DC: National Chamber Foundation, 1992); Thomas D. Hopkins, "Costs of Regulation: Filling the Gaps," report prepared for the Regulatory Information Service Center, August 1992; "Cost of Regulation Isn't Easy to Figure but Estimates Exist," Wall Street Journal, September 23, 1992, p. A6.
10.
Science, January 8, 1993, p. 159.
11.
Robert W. Hahn and John A. Hird, "The Costs and Benefits of Regulation: Review and Synthesis," Yale Journal on Regulation 8 ( Winter 1991), pp. 233-78; Robert E. Litan and William D. Nordhaus, Reforming Federal Regulation ( New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1983); and Murray L. Weidenbaum and

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reducing Unemployment: A Case for Government Deregulation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chapter 1 - THE COSTS OF UNEMPLOYMENT 1
  • Notes 10
  • Chapter 2 - THE NAIRU 11
  • Notes 28
  • Chapter 3 - A FAULTY DIAGNOSIS OF UNEMPLOYMENT 30
  • Notes 48
  • Chapter 4 - BUSINESS COSTS, GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS, AND THE NAIRU 51
  • Notes 73
  • Chapter 5 - UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE, SOCIAL WELFARE, AND THE NAIRU 75
  • Notes 96
  • Chapter 6 - THE UNION WAGE PREMIUM AND THE NAIRU 98
  • Notes 114
  • Chapter 7 - UNION PRODUCTIVITY EFFECTS, LABOR LAW, AND THE NAIRU 117
  • Notes 133
  • Chapter 8 - PRODUCTIVITY AND THE NAIRU 136
  • Notes 143
  • Chapter 9 - SUMMARY 144
  • Notes 155
  • Bibliography 157
  • Index 165
  • About the Authors 173
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.