Women of Courage: Jewish and Italian Immigrant Women in New York

By Rose Laub Coser; Laura S. Anker et al. | Go to book overview

List of Interviewees
We are deeply indebted to the women who agreed to be interviewed, often for long periods of time, for the study. The women's names have been changed in the text to protect their anonymity. We offer our gratitude and respect to them, and our apologies to any we have inadvertently left out. These are the women discussed and quoted in the book:
Adelina Abbatista
Catherina Allessandrina
Esther Antonofsky
Tamur Bacharech
Catherine Barruso
Eva Bashe
Ruth Bashe
Blanch Berg
Yolanda Berger
Betty Binik
Fanny Blumenthal
Muriel Braselier
Edith Bregman
Julia Brooks
Rebecca Burdman
Mary Cassado
Rose Chaikind
Antoinette Cocozelli
Anne Cohn
Debbie Crystel
Donna D'Amico
Mrs. D'Amico
Rose Dartort
Angelina Datello
Antoinette DeGennaro
Ida Dubinsky
Fanny Duboys
Emma Fatino
Mollie Feierstein
Licausi Filippina
Zelda Findur
Ethel Fisher
Rose Schneier Freidman
Gussie Friedman
Bella Fuchs
Pasqualina Galante
Rose Geisser
Shirley Goldberg
Nancy Grasso
Anna Greenholtz
Sophie Halpern
Sara Heller

-vii-

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