The Several Worlds of Pearl S. Buck: Essays Presented at a Centennial Symposium, Randolph-Macon Woman's College, March 26-28, 1992

By Elizabeth J. Lipscomb; Frances E. Webb et al. | Go to book overview

10
Who's Afraid of Pear S. Buck?

Jane M. Rabb

When I fast became interested in Pearl Buck in the late 1970s, I went to the library to read more about her. Aware that the feminist movement had inspired countless books on women writers, I was astonished by the scarcity of material about Buck. Now, more than fifteen years later, I remain astonished that so little attention has been paid to her by scholars. Why do the shelves continue to fill up with books about Jane Austen and Emily Brontë, Edith Wharton and Virginia Woolf, but not about Pearl Buck, certainly one of the most distinguished figures America--if not the world--has ever produced?

This group hardly needs to be reminded of her many accomplishments, but apparently others have forgotten them. She was the first American woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, breaking new ground with her ethnic characters and honest depictions of hitherto taboo subjects, such as childbirth, while expanding the frontiers of established genres, such as biography. As a humanitarian, she publicly and pragmatically addressed the problems of children handicapped by birth defects or mixed race and inspired others to do the same. As an unofficial diplomat, she introduced Americans to Asia through her writings and through the organizations she founded to improve East-West relations, and even influenced government initiatives. Finally, her insights about racism, scientific ethics, and sexism make her a forerunner of the civil rights, antinuclear, and feminist movements. Indeed, in many respects, Buck is still so far ahead of her time that these movements have not caught up with her. Certainly there are more eminent writers, humanitarians, diplomats, disarmament experts, civil rights advocates, and feminists, but no one individual, male or female, comes to mind who has accomplished so much in so many significant areas.

Buck's humanitarian legacy endures through Welcome House and the foundation bearing her name, the two still-flourishing organizations she founded to alleviate the plight of mixed-race children. 1 Her example also

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Several Worlds of Pearl S. Buck: Essays Presented at a Centennial Symposium, Randolph-Macon Woman's College, March 26-28, 1992
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.