Women's Careers: Pathways and Pitfalls

By Suzanna Rose; Laurie Larwood | Go to book overview

1
Charting Women's Careers: Current Issues and Research

Suzanna Rose Laurie Larwood


PREVIEW

A vast amount of information on women and work is available today. In writing this chapter, we decided to focus on only a few of the most relevant issues confronting professional women. Our emphasis was on women who have made a clear commitment to their career. Issues related to working women in general were brought in only where they affected the status of the woman professional. What we present here represents a very selective look at the contemporary career woman-- her opportunities, goals, personality, relationships, and family life.

The importance of careers in the plans and lives of women continues to grow as people become aware that the working woman now has replaced the housewife as the norm in the United States. The absolute number of women in the workforce currently exceeds that of men ( U.S. Department of Labor Statistics 1986). By 1990, 70-75 percent of all women aged 18-64 are expected to be in the labor force, compared to 63 percent for 1984. "Having it all" is the goal of a majority of young women who plan to work all or most of their lives and have a family, too ( Betz and Fitzgerald 1987).

Striking changes in how women's careers are viewed have accompanied their increased occupational involvement. Early models of career development aimed at men failed to account for the many factors that uniquely affect women's careers, including cultural and organizational barriers to women's advancement, sex role training, and competing work and family roles. Interest in women's careers has burgeoned in the past decade, however, producing a flood of research about women and work

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women's Careers: Pathways and Pitfalls
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.