World Population Trends and Their Impact on Economic Development

By Dominick Salvatore | Go to book overview
there is an irreducible group of first principles, which must be balanced, in an intuitive way, against each other. See Rawls, 1971: 34-40.
4.
Other taxonomies are clearly possible by using either more general or more particular concepts. For a more complete justification of the six goods listed in the text see Finnis, 1980: 85-97.
5.
Finnis, 1980: 166.
6.
In the bishops' letter the term "solidarity" is more frequently used to refer to every person's obligation to promote the common good.
7.
Subsidiarity is a requirement of efficiency. The smaller the group, the better able the group is to determine the practical means to foster the flourishing of individuals within the group.
8.
In a society in which all individuals were absolutely identical, it would be hard to conceive of community or society as we normally understand it, since the reason people share thoughts, goods, and emotions with one another is precisely because people are different. For this reason it is very difficult to analyze in moral terms economic models that presuppose that all individuals have identical preference functions and offer homogeneous labor.
9.
The question of savings is difficult since the developing country is much poorer. In Aristotlean fashion, one can claim that savings are the same if they are proportional, given the income level in each country. Alternatively, if the developing country is saving at approximately the same rate at which the developed country saved when it was in its developing stage, then one can conclude that there is no significant difference in savings.
10.
See Mischan, 1981: 125-52, for a thorough discussion of the economic difficulties associated with externalities. Also Cowen ( 1985) questions the surgical distinction between private goods, on the one hand, and public goods, on the other.
11.
See Stiglitz, 1987.
12.
This model is the general equilibrium model of Heckscher-Ohlin theory. For an exposition see Jones, 1965.
13.
The growth model is an adaptation of Dornbusch's static model of interdependent countries ( Dornbusch, 1980).
14.
Expenditures are affected by y, the growth in GNP. However, for simplicity this relationship has not been included. None of the results are changed if y is included as an argument of e.
15.
Normally one considers growth in population to have a positive effect on supply. In this type of Keynesian model, however, the economy is driven by effective demand. Excessively rapid population growth puts a drag on effective demand.

REFERENCES

Aristotle. Nicomachean Ethics, trans. by Martin Oswald. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Educational Publishing.

Cowen Tyler ( 1985). "A Public Goods Definition and Their Institutional Context: A Critique of Public Goods Theory." Review of Social Economy 43( 1): 53-63.

Dornbusch Rudiger ( 1980). Open Economy Macroeconomics. New York: Basic Books.

Finnis John ( 1980). Natural Law and Natural Rights. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Jones Ronald W. ( 1965). "The Structure of Simple General Equilibrium Models." Journal of Political Economy 73: 557-72.

Little Ian M. D. ( 1982). Economic Development. New York: Basic Books.

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