The Practice of Uncertainty: Voices of Physicians and Patients in Medical Malpractice Claims

By Stephen L. Fielding | Go to book overview

PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I began interviewing people for this study in 1990. The in-depth interviews of physicians who had been sued, patients who had sued their physicians, and lawyers and malpractice insurance administrators were not completed until 1995. Those involved in medical malpractice claims were often hard to locate; some did not want to talk to me. Some physicians, because of their hectic schedules, canceled their appointments for interviews. To those people who did allow me to interview them, whom I cannot name for confidentiality reasons--thank you. Without you, there would be no book. Dawn Hilton, Sarah Hubinski, Susan Lee, and Joan Strobel helped me with the huge task of transcribing the interviews. My thanks go to the Geneseo Foundation which funded a major portion of the recruitment and transcribing expenses associated with these interviews.

It took fifteen months to obtain the statistical data from New York State, although technically they are in the public domain. I want to thank publicly Chris Coward, then at the Office of Professional Medical Conduct, and Assemblyman Joe Morelle, without whose help I might never have gotten these data. Lance Hannon labeled and cleaned the data. I also wish to thank the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Medicine for the release of its malpractice claims data, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for making the National Practitioner Data Bank available.

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Practice of Uncertainty: Voices of Physicians and Patients in Medical Malpractice Claims
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xv
  • People Interviewed xvii
  • Notes xxiii
  • 1 - Historical and Social Background 1
  • 2 - Setting the Contemporary Stage 25
  • Notes 43
  • 3 - System Accidents 49
  • Notes 66
  • 4 - Uncertainty -- Which Diagnosis and Treatment? 69
  • Summary 81
  • 5 - We Were Going to Be Society's Heroes 83
  • Summary and Discussion 98
  • 6 - Am I the Same? 103
  • 7 - Gender and Telling the Story 123
  • Summary 144
  • 8 - The Defense of Wealth 147
  • Notes 168
  • 9 - Implications 171
  • Notes 196
  • Appendix - Theory and Method 199
  • Notes 208
  • Bibliography 211
  • Index 225
  • About the Author 231
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.