Political Mischief: Smear, Sabotage, and Reform in U.S. Elections

By Bruce L. Felknor | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am deeply indebted to many people--no few of them now dead--over many years for what is in this book, and I thank them all most heartily. They are found in several contexts.

First, that of the Fair Campaign Practices Committee (FCPC): Most important, Charles P. Taft, Harry Louis Selden, William Benton, and Anna Lord Strauss. For getting me involved in it (and out of it), and for a wealth of information, ideas, and support over many years, George E. Agree. For generous and underpaid staff support going well beyond the call of duty, Roslyn Hosenball (most especially), Woodruff M. Price, Fred Andrews, Sam Archibald, Rhoda Z. Bernstein, Barbara C. Brown, Leo Frome, Janet Kaufman, Joanna Mudrock, and many volunteers.

In the political science community: Herbert E. Alexander, Totton J. Anderson, Stephen K. Bailey, Hugh A. Bone, Paul David, Alexander Heard, Bernard C. Hennessy (especially), Donald G. Herzberg, Robert J. Huckshorn (especially), Frank H. Jonas, Charles O. Jones, Stanley Kelley, Jr., Evron Kirkpatrick, Arthur L. Peterson, Clinton L. Rossiter, John S. Saloma III, Richard M. Scammon, Paul Seabury, Rhoten A. Smith, Walter De Vries, Alan Westin, and many more.

Among members of Congress, variously for their support for the FCPC and for invaluable political insights and lore: Former Congressmen Thomas B. Curtis (especially), Hale Boggs, John Brademas, Gillis Long, William Steiger, and Charles A. Vanik; and former Senators Clifford Case, Hubert Humphrey, Jacob K. Javits, Thomas H. Kuchel, Herbert H. Lehman, Eugene McCarthy, Gale McGee, George McGovern, Charles E. Percy, Hugh Scott, Margaret Chase Smith, and several dozen others.

Political operatives of one sort or another: John M. Bailey, Sam Brightman (especially), Julius Cahn, James H. Duffy, Creekmore Fath, Meyer Feldman, Robert H. Finch, Ewing Hass, Russell Hemenway, Leonard W. Hall, Ken

-xi-

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