Political Mischief: Smear, Sabotage, and Reform in U.S. Elections

By Bruce L. Felknor | Go to book overview

1
The Nominating Process: Finding Someone to Run

American colonists were electing delegates to various local and provincial offices long before the idea of independence from Britain gained any currency. Usually candidates for such offices were proposed by informal assemblies of local elders. At least by the 1720s, many of these candidateselection sessions were called caucuses, or contemporary variations on what became that word.


CAUCUS: THE SMOKE-FILLED ROOM

However spelled, the caucus probably originated as the name of a Boston political club or clubs early in the eighteenth century. "Caucus" may or may not derive from an Algonquian word, caucausu, meaning an advisor, or from an obscure Latin borrowing from a Greek word for drinking vessel, kaukos. In 1763 John Adams wrote in Boston of learning

that the Caucas Clubb meets at certain Times in the Garret of Tom Daws [where] they smoke tobacco till you cannot see from one End of the Garrett to the other. There they drink Phlipp I suppose, and there . . . select Men, Assessors, Collectors, Wardens, Fire Wards, and Representatives are Regularly chosen before they are chosen in the Town. ( Adams 1961, 1:238)

Elsewhere Adams spelled the word "caucass," but these versions were rendered as caucus in his grandson Charles Francis Adams's edition of the second president's papers. Other of John Adams's contemporaries wrote it as Caulkers, supposing the meetings to have occurred in a place where ship- related business went on. We know that there were several Boston caucuses, and in the 1740s one such meeting was known as the West-Corcus. However spelled, the term spread from Boston across the colonies, and if Americans did not know its origin they clearly understood its purpose.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Mischief: Smear, Sabotage, and Reform in U.S. Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.