Political Mischief: Smear, Sabotage, and Reform in U.S. Elections

By Bruce L. Felknor | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER I
1.
Speech of Congressman Charles Ogle, reprinted in the Log Cabin, August 1, 1840.

CHAPTER 2
1.
The films are in the archive of his son, Charles Benton of Public Media, Inc.
2.
I am most grateful to Walter De Vries for putting me onto Quintus Cicero and his campaign manual.
3.
I was one of the apprehensive observers in Dirty Politics ( 1966).

CHAPTER 3
1.
James Thomson Callender, The Prospect Before Us, Part III, 58, and Preface, Part I, 179, quoted in Brodie 1974, 321.
2.
Videotape copies of most of the significant political commercials of the television age are held by the Department of Political History at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Their curator is William L. (Larry) Bird and the department is headed by Keith Melder. Another important resource is the Political Commercial Archive at the University of Oklahoma, headed by Julian Kanter. The preeminent academic authority on political video is Kathleen Hall Jamieson, dean of the Annenberg School of Communication of the University of Pennsylvania.

Representative political video ads from the entire television era have been assembled on a series of videocassettes produced by the publishers of Campaigns & Elections magazine of Washington, D.C. These are held by sophisticated libraries and may be purchased from the publisher.

3.
Jamieson, essay presented at her 1990 conference, "The Challenge of Creating an Informed Electorate," National Press Club, Washington, D.C., May 7, 1990.
4.
In one of those frequent but unaccountable distortions that creep into scholarly recitals of campaign lore, Doyle Dane Bernbach's 1964 commercial showing the eastern seaboard being sawed off is described as being done with a power saw. In

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