The Changing Outplacement Process: New Methods and Opportunities for Transition Management

By John L. Meyer; Carolyn C. Shadle | Go to book overview

Campaigning and Interviewing in Multicultural Contexts

The globalization of hiring and the changing demographics of the workplace suggest that OTR firms will increasingly be training their candidates to understand the expectations in various cultures related to use of the resume and cover letter or the process of networking.

OTR firms will hire and train staff to teach candidates how to interview in multicultural contexts. It is generally understood that employers tend to hire people like themselves and especially, if they have the choice, someone they know. This is, in part, because interviewers feel that knowing where the job applicants come from--being familiar with the candidates' schools, communities, affiliations, and even family ties--enables employers to assess the likelihood of the candidates' success. When the cultural backgrounds of the interviewers and interviewees do not match, however, job applicants are at a disadvantage. Effective OTR firms will seek to understand the meaning that symbols and frames of reference have for interviewers and help their candidates prepare to overcome potential gaps.


SUMMARY

Many aspects of the new OTR process represent improvements in the effectiveness of its delivery. These include modifications described in Chapter 15, such as adapting OTR for groups or individuals, providing the service bundled or unbundled, and packaging it for executives or for hourly workers.

This chapter outlined other aspects of the new OTR process, which attempt to address changes in the environment of work. Technology, globalization, and streamlining have resulted in a new careerism. The new way we view careers has resulted in modifications in the OTR process and its delivery. These changes suggest trends that are likely to continue into the next century.


NOTES
1.
Robert Wegmann, Robert Chapman, and Miriam Johnson, Work in the New Economy: Careers and Job Seeking into the 21st Century ( Indianapolis: JIST Works, 1989).
2.
Interview with Murray Axmith, Chairman, Axmith & Associates, Ltd.
3.
Interview with Ruthan Rosenberg; and Jill Jukes and Ruthan Rosenberg, Surviving Your Partner's Job Loss: The Complete Guide to Rescuing Your Marriage and Family from Today's Economy ( Washington, DC: National Press Books, 1993).
4.
Cited in Joseph P. Ritz, "Loss of Job Is Bringing Families Closer Together," Buffalo News, July 24, 1993, p. B6.
5.
Uma Sekaran, Dual Career Families ( San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1986); and James Challenger , Outplacement ( Chicago: Apex Publishing Company, 1993).
6.
"Presentation of Programs, Lee Hecht Harrison Group Services," booklet published by LHH, Inc., n.d.
7.
Challenger, Outplacement.
8.
Lance Morrow, "The Temping of America," Time, March 29, 1993, p. 40.

-196-

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The Changing Outplacement Process: New Methods and Opportunities for Transition Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • Note xix
  • Part I The New Careerism 1
  • 1: The Turbulent World of Work 3
  • Notes 16
  • 2: When the Employee Is Outplaced 19
  • 3: The Ripple Effect 27
  • Part II The New Outplacement Process 41
  • Part II the New Outplacement Process 43
  • Notes 50
  • 5: Getting Terminated Employees Started 51
  • Notes 62
  • Career Decision Making 95
  • Notes 101
  • Notes 123
  • 13: Networking 131
  • Notes 143
  • 14: Employment Interviewing 145
  • Notes 167
  • Part III The OTR Process and Its Industry 169
  • Part III the Otr Process and Its Industry 171
  • Notes 183
  • 16: The New Otr Process and the New Careerism 185
  • Notes 196
  • Notes 199
  • Notes 221
  • Notes 221
  • 18: Challenges and Responses 225
  • 19: Choosing Wisely 247
  • Notes 263
  • Appendix A Historical Perspective 265
  • Notes 266
  • Appendix B Chronology of the Outplacement Profession 267
  • Appendix C Career Transition Resources 271
  • Appendix D Reemployment Act of 1994 275
  • Selected Bibliography 277
  • Index 283
  • About the Authors 291
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