State Police in the United States: A Socio-Historical Analysis

By H. Kenneth Bechtel | Go to book overview

ing the size of the highway patrol and granting it greater powers of arrest and jurisdiction.


SUMMARY

Beginning in 1917, eight successive attempts were made to create a paramilitary state police force in Illinois--and all failed. Although the legislatures of 1921 and 1923 did establish "highway patrol" forces, these were small organizations restricted to enforcing traffic and highway maintenance laws. These forces were quite unlike the powerful state police forces of Pennsylvania, New York, or Michigan sought by Dunlap in his legislation. Given the strength and influence of various groups such as the Chicago and Illinois Chambers of Commerce, the Illinois Bankers' Association, the Illinois Farm Bureau, and the powerful Illinois Manufacturers' Association--all supporting the drive for a state police--the failure to enact such legislation is surprising.

To understand fully the failure of state police legislation in Illinois, one must take into consideration such factors as the political strength of organized labor, the impact of ethnic divisions within the political establishment, the debate between "wets" and "drys" over prohibition, the relationship between downstate and Chicago, as well as the complicated political arrangements in both the city of Chicago and Cook County in general. These and other important factors will be discussed in Chapter 6 in an attempt to provide some analysis and interpretation of the facts presented in this chapter on efforts to establish a state police in Illinois.


NOTES
1.
Journal of the House, 50th sess., 1917, p. 429, Journal of the Senate, 50th sess., 1917, p. 519.
2.
Illinois State Journal, March 23, 1917, p. 11; Senate Bill no. 407, 50th sess., 1917; House Bill no. 715, 50th sess., 1917.
3.
Journal of the House, 50th sess., 1917, p. 584; Journal of the Senate, 50th sess., 1917, p. 519.
4.
Journal of the House, 51st sess., 1919, p. 47; Journal of the Senate, 51st sess., 1919, p. 298.
5.
Chicago Tribune, January 18, 1919; Copy of bill (no number or date), John Fitzpatrick Papers, box 8, folder 59, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago.
6.
House Bill no. 38, 51st sess, 1919.
7.
Senate Bill no. 43, 51st sess., 1919.
8.
Chicago Tribune, February 11, 1919, p. 16.
9.
Illinois State Journal, February 14, 1919, p. 18.
10.
Journal of the Senate, 51st sess., 1919, pp. 397, 417, 463, 480, 495, 525, 570.
11.
Champaign Daily-News, February 26, 1919.

-85-

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State Police in the United States: A Socio-Historical Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • Notes 9
  • Chapter 2 What Do We Know About the State Police? 13
  • Notes 22
  • Chapter 3 State Police Development, 1835-1941 25
  • Notes 44
  • Chapter 4 - The State Police in Historical Context 49
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter 5 State Police Development in Illinois, 1917-1929 65
  • Notes 85
  • Chapter 6 the State Police Movement in Illinois 89
  • Notes 110
  • Chapter 7 Creating the State Police in Colorado 113
  • Notes 130
  • Chapter 8 Analysis of the State Police Movement 133
  • Notes 145
  • Appendix - Suggestions for Further Research on the State Police 147
  • BIBLIOGRAPHIES AND DIGESTS 148
  • GENERAL WORKS--BOOKS 149
  • GENERAL WORKS--ARITICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS 149
  • GENERAL WORKS--ARITICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS 151
  • GENERAL WORKS--ARITICLES AND BOOK CHAPTERS 152
  • Bibliography 161
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 180
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