Total Quality Marketing: The Key to Regaining Market Shares

By Allan C. Reddy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Total Quality Marketing: A Sound Solution

This chapter introduces Total Quality Marketing, a market-driven concept. It is different from the production-oriented Total Quality Management (TQM) concept. Perfect products do not sell themselves without proper marketing effort. Unless customers "perceive" quality, improving the product quality alone is not enough. Market Perceived Quality is also discussed here.

To make consumers perceive quality in a proper light, the application of TQMkt is necessary. Product quality by itself does not sell products, and improving it without regard to the marketability of the product is inconsequential. Therefore, firms should manufacture and market products that consumers perceive as good quality and value.

Business history is filled with examples of products that have failed miserably in the marketplace because consumers perceived their quality to be either inappropriate or inadequate. For example, New Coke, Listerine toothpaste, and RCA video disc are all products that failed in the marketplace. Another example is the unchanging negative public perception of American cars although American car makers made massive quality improvements to their cars. Cars imported from Japan or Germany in particular are perceived to be superior to the domestic makes.

The term quality means different things to different people. It has many meanings depending on whose perspective is used -- the manufacturer's or the consumer's. For a manufacturer, quality means the most effective way of producing a product -- saving time and money. For a consumer, it means that the product is "the best value" that money could buy.

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