Organizational Politics, Justice, and Support: Managing the Social Climate of the Workplace

By Russell S. Cropanzano; K. Michele Kacmar | Go to book overview

6
Procedural Justice and Influence
Tactics: Fairness, Frequency,
and Effectiveness

Maureen L. Ambroseand Lynn K. Harland

[T]he basic OP (organizational politics) situation occurs when goal attainment is sought by informal rather than formal means of influence in the face of potential conflict.

Drory & Romm, 1990, p. 1148 (emphasis added)

In this chapter, we suggest that the areas of organizational politics and procedural justice are inextricably intertwined. Discretionary (i.e., informal) behaviors are not subject to the organization's formalized system of rules and guidelines and thus are most likely to be wielded in procedurally unfair ways. In contrast to organizational procedures that are specifically delineated via rules and guidelines (e.g., sick leave, holidays), discretionary behaviors are more likely to be enacted on an individual basis that differs across organizational actors. No research explicitly examines the relationship between perceived fairness and political behavior, although some implicitly link the two. For example, Drory ( 1993) equates perceptions of fairness with perceptions of the political climate in an organization, and Drory and Beaty ( 1991) assess the perceived morality of political behavior.

This chapter focuses on one aspect of organizational politics--influence tactics. Research on influence tactics demonstrates that recipients' reactions to influence attempts differ depending upon the particular tactic employed. However, this research provides little theoretical explanation as to why some influence tactics are received more favorably than others. We believe the literature on procedural justice provides a useful theoretical framework for understanding the differential acceptability of various influence strategies.

Justice researchers have articulated a number of criteria by which indi-

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Organizational Politics, Justice, and Support: Managing the Social Climate of the Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.