Organizational Politics, Justice, and Support: Managing the Social Climate of the Workplace

By Russell S. Cropanzano; K. Michele Kacmar | Go to book overview

9
Total Quality Teams: How Organizational Politics and Support Impact the Effectiveness of Quality Improvement Teams

John C. Howes, Maryalice Citera, and Russell S. Cropanzano

From manufacturing to service, many U.S. organizations are implementing total quality programs ( Lawler, Mohrman, & Ledford, 1992). In one recent survey of Fortune 1000 companies, Lawler et al. ( 1992) found that a full 76% of the respondents reported that their company used total quality with at least some employees. Indeed, in the past several years a focus on quality improvement has swept through American industry, transforming the way that many companies do business ( MIT Commission on Industrial Productivity, 1989). Despite this tide of change, academic researchers have been quiescent almost to the point of negligence. There has been very little research focusing on the concept of total quality management ( Dean & Bowen, 1994). The focus of this chapter is to use the concepts of politics and support to understand and predict the effectiveness of quality improvement teams. As we shall see, this will require that we conceptualize politics and support a little differently. Previously, research has examined social climate perceptions from the perspective of the individual. We develop a model of social climate that considers both the team and the organizational level. First, however, we need to outline what total quality improvement is about.


TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT: THE ROLE OF TEAMWORK

Although there are many different philosophies and implementations of total quality management, some key principles are common among them: (1) customer focus, (2) quality work the first time, (3) continuous improvement, and (4) teamwork ( Dean & Bowen, 1994; Bowen & Lawler, 1992).

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Organizational Politics, Justice, and Support: Managing the Social Climate of the Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.