Presidential Power and Management Techniques: The Carter and Reagan Administrations in Historical Perspective

By James G. Benze Jr. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In writing this book, I have become indebted to a large number of people. David A. Caputo, Robert Sahr, and Dean Knudsen read early drafts of the manuscript, and the final copy is much better for their advice.

My greatest intellectual debt is owed to Myron Q. Hale, who has greatly influenced my thoughts on presidential power and presidential management. The material on presidential power in Chapter 1 has been shamelessly borrowed from his own work. I am grateful that he was so generous with his ideas.

I am also, of course, grateful to the numerous civil servants who participated in not just one, but two mail surveys. Without their help and valuable insight, this book would not have been possible.

I would also like to thank two people whose impact, while less direct, was nonetheless important. Rodney Hero and Eugene Declercq were the friends who helped me through the rough moments.

Finally, no list of acknowledgments would be complete without mentioning my wife Pamela. Not only was she kind, patient, and understanding during very trying times, but quite literally without her editorial skills, this book might not have been completed. In terms of level of commitment, the book is as much hers as mine.

Of course, while all of the above contributed mightily, I take sole responsibility for the ideas presented in this book.

-xiii-

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Presidential Power and Management Techniques: The Carter and Reagan Administrations in Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science Series Editor: Bernard K. Johnpoll ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 4
  • 1 - Presidential Power and Presidential Management 5
  • Summary 13
  • Notes 14
  • 2 - The Origins of Presidential Management 17
  • Summary 28
  • Notes 29
  • 3 - The History of Management Techniques 31
  • Summary 50
  • Notes 50
  • 4 - Management in the Carter Administration 55
  • Summary 72
  • SUMMARY 72
  • 5 - Management in the Reagan Administration 77
  • Notes 94
  • 6 - An Empirical Investigation of Presidential Management 97
  • Summary 113
  • Notes 114
  • 7 - The Limits of Management Techniques and the Importance of Presidential Leadership 117
  • Summary 133
  • Notes 134
  • Conclusion: The Future of Presidential Management 137
  • Bibliography 143
  • Notes on Methodology 149
  • Index 153
  • About the Author 159
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