Sex Differences in Political Participation: Processes of Change in Fourteen Nations

By Carol A. Christy | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Since I became interested in this topic fifteen years ago, my work has taken many different forms: a Ph.D. dissertation, six convention papers, two journal articles, and finally, this book. Along the way I've been helped tremendously by many colleagues' comments on these different versions. I particularly thank my dissertation advisors Bradley Richardson and Kristi Andersen; they suffered patiently through numerous drafts and a six-hundred page final manuscript. I'm also indebted to some excellent anonymous reviews from Women & Politics and Comparative Political Studies. Finally, the reviewers of this manuscript gave me stunningly brilliant advice. Special thanks to Rita Mae Kelly for engaging these reviewers and to Kate Manzo for her detailed comments.

Many people also helped me gather the information. Joyce Mohler of the Ohio University-Lancaster Library located obscure books.' Adam Marsh of the Ohio University Office of Research and Sponsored Programs obtained the surveys from the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research. Barry Garrett of Ohio University-Lancaster, and Chuck Rich, Bob Watkins, and Paul Kierns of the Ohio University Computing and Learning Services all guided me through the intricacies of the computer system. Before Ohio University joined the ICPSR, the Ohio State University Political Science department gave me access to these data through an appointment as adjunct professor. I'm now examining trend data not available through the ICPSR; the Ohio University Research Committee helped finance my trip to the Norwegian and Swedish Social Science Data Services, and the Ohio University-Lancaster Research Committee partially covered my expenses at the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Storrs, Connecticut. The Women's Studies Program at the University of Connecticut particularly facilitated my visit to the Roper Center.

Finally, thanks to all those who helped me prepare this manuscript: Eric Heyne for his outstanding advice on composition, Pat Sain for her skill in word processing, and Brad Bates and Gary Lockwood for helping design and draft the figures. The Ohio University-Lancaster Research Committee covered some of the expenses

-xi-

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Sex Differences in Political Participation: Processes of Change in Fourteen Nations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - Cross-National Variations 35
  • Notes 66
  • 3 - Within-Nation Variations 67
  • Notes 93
  • 4 - Temporal Variations 95
  • Notes 112
  • 5 - Conclusion 115
  • Appendix A The Surveys 123
  • Appendix B The Intervening and Dependent Variables 127
  • Appendix C The Independent Variables 133
  • Appendix D Sex Differences in Political Participation 139
  • References and Bibliography 155
  • Index 179
  • About the Author 193
  • Series Editors' Sketches 195
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