Sex Differences in Political Participation: Processes of Change in Fourteen Nations

By Carol A. Christy | Go to book overview

Appendix A
The Surveys
The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) of Ann Arbor, Michigan provided for surveys used in this study. Its Guide to Resources and Services describes these surveys and lists the principal investigators. The ICPSR also publishes codebooks for each survey which detail the sampling methodology and question wording. Incidentally, neither the original collectors of the data nor the consortium bear any responsibility for the analyses or interpretations presented here. The main body presents only the combined results from different surveys of a single nation. Appendix D presents the results broken down by survey.
1. Election Studies
United States. "American National Election Study, 1976" (weighted N=1204 men, 1657 women)
"American National Election Study, 1980" (N=694 men, 919 women)
Great Britain. "Political Change in Britain, 1963-1970" Data from the 1963- 1964 waves only. (weighted N=813 men, 970 women)
"British Election Studies: October 1974, Cross Section" (N=1177 men, 1188 women)
Germany. "German Election Panel Study, 1976" (weighted N=947 men, 1128 women)
"German Election Panel Study, 1972" (weighted N=916 men, 1102 women)
Norway. "Norwegian Election Study, 1965" (N=885 men, 864 women)
France. "French Election Study, 1958" Results from the two elections were combined. (weighted N=871 men, 998 women)
"French National Election Study, 1967" (N=935 men, 1034 women)
Italy. "Italian Mass Election Survey, 1972" (N=884 men, 952 women)
"Italian Mass Election Survey, 1968" (N=1228 men, 1251 women)
Japan. "Japanese National Election Study, 1967" Those under twenty were

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Sex Differences in Political Participation: Processes of Change in Fourteen Nations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - Cross-National Variations 35
  • Notes 66
  • 3 - Within-Nation Variations 67
  • Notes 93
  • 4 - Temporal Variations 95
  • Notes 112
  • 5 - Conclusion 115
  • Appendix A The Surveys 123
  • Appendix B The Intervening and Dependent Variables 127
  • Appendix C The Independent Variables 133
  • Appendix D Sex Differences in Political Participation 139
  • References and Bibliography 155
  • Index 179
  • About the Author 193
  • Series Editors' Sketches 195
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