Immigration, Stress, and Readjustment

By Zeev Ben-Sira | Go to book overview

Introduction
Immigration-- A Stress-Precipitating Change

THE GROWING SIGNIFICANCE OF MIGRATION

Over the past century, migration has become an increasingly widespread phenomenon, motivated by political, economic, psychological, and ideological factors. Speaking of immigration to the United States, Doris Meissner, then Migration and Naturalization Commissioner in Washington, stated in 1993: "[M]igration is not an issue that can be solved, unless some very dramatic things change in the world. In our lifetimes we're talking about a new global reality that we have to find ways of living with and managing, and not somehow delude ourselves into thinking that we [can] make it go away" ( Brownstein 1993: A20). 1

Westermeyer ( 1991:127-128) contends that some hundred million people have fled their countries due to war, civil unrest, and political or religious persecution during the last fifty years. Aaronson ( 1984) estimates that sixteen million people were either in transit or had recently been granted asylum in a foreign country during the early 1980s. A substantial proportion of the American population is composed of refugees from World War II, the unsuccessful Hungarian and Czechoslovak revolutions, Cuba, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, East Africa, and Iran. It is likely that more than four million illegal immigrants currently live in the United States ( "Great Divide" 1993). Similar statistics could undoubtedly be cited for many other countries, and certainly for Israel, which, like the United States, is a country of immigrants.

-xi-

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Immigration, Stress, and Readjustment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword - The Academic Work of Zeev Ben-Sira vii
  • Introduction - Immigration-- A Stress-Precipitating Change xi
  • Notes xviii
  • 1 - Immigration--A Desirable Yet Disillusioning Social Change 1
  • 2 - Reasons for Migration and the Absorbing Society's Perspectives 7
  • CONCLUSION: THE EFFECT OF THE INTERPRETATION OF SOCIETAL PERSPECTIVES ON READJUSTMENT 28
  • Notes 28
  • 3 Immigration and Stress: A General Overview 31
  • Conclusion 43
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Immigration and Readjustment 45
  • SUMMARY 54
  • 5 - Integration 55
  • 6 - Demands, Stressors, and Catalysts 75
  • Note 95
  • 7 - Coping and Resources 97
  • CONCLUSION: THE EFFECT OF IMMIGRATION ON RESOURCES AND POTENCY 119
  • 8 - An Empirical Model of Readjustment 121
  • APPENDICES 137
  • Bibliography 159
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 179
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