Immigration, Stress, and Readjustment

By Zeev Ben-Sira | Go to book overview

population groups. The questionnaires for the immigrants were translated into Russian (for further details, see Appendix A).


OUTLINE OF THE WORK

In Chapter 2, I explore the paradox of a reciprocally desirable but disillusioning change instigated by immigration and address questions regarding the stress-precipitating impact of social change instigated by immigration. I also delineate the hopes and expectations of both immigrants and members of absorbing societies and analyze the complexity of the immigration process as an extreme change in the life of both the immigrants and the absorbing society. In Chapter 3, I review current approaches to the stress-readjustment process and propose a multivariate comprehensive paradigm, demonstrating the usefulness of this paradigm for an understanding of the concomitant readjustment to the life- change instigated by immigration. In Chapters 4 through 7, I separately analyze each component of the stress-readjustment process, test it empirically, and apply it both to a conceptualization of the relevant characteristics of immigration and an elucidation of their role in concomitant readjustment. In Chapter 8, I apply Smallest Space Analysis (SSA), a multivariate data analysis method developed by the late Louis Guttman, to create an "empirical structure of readjustment," which summarizes, the factors promoting and impeding the mutual readjustment of immigrants and veterans and also the interplay among these factors. Finally, I conclude with the effects of the interrelationships among intra- and intergroup components on the concomitant readjustment of both immigrants and veterans and discuss the applicability of the "structure of readjustment" to a better understanding of the factors that impede and promote readjustment in migratory movements in general.


NOTES
1.
The quotation is based on an interview published in the Los Angeles Times as part of a series on immigration in the 1990s.
2.
A short-term disturbance will be called "tension." See Chapter 3 for further elaboration of this subject.
3.
Although the term "host society" is often used to refer to the country of destination of immigrants, I prefer "absorbing society" as more appropriate for describing the nature of a society that is bound not merely to house the immigrants but eventually to absorb them.

-xviii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Immigration, Stress, and Readjustment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword - The Academic Work of Zeev Ben-Sira vii
  • Introduction - Immigration-- A Stress-Precipitating Change xi
  • Notes xviii
  • 1 - Immigration--A Desirable Yet Disillusioning Social Change 1
  • 2 - Reasons for Migration and the Absorbing Society's Perspectives 7
  • CONCLUSION: THE EFFECT OF THE INTERPRETATION OF SOCIETAL PERSPECTIVES ON READJUSTMENT 28
  • Notes 28
  • 3 Immigration and Stress: A General Overview 31
  • Conclusion 43
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Immigration and Readjustment 45
  • SUMMARY 54
  • 5 - Integration 55
  • 6 - Demands, Stressors, and Catalysts 75
  • Note 95
  • 7 - Coping and Resources 97
  • CONCLUSION: THE EFFECT OF IMMIGRATION ON RESOURCES AND POTENCY 119
  • 8 - An Empirical Model of Readjustment 121
  • APPENDICES 137
  • Bibliography 159
  • Index 173
  • About the Author 179
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.