Our Friend Manso

By Benito Pérez Galdós; Robert Russell | Go to book overview

XLV
"MY MOTHER"

YOU LEAVE HER TO ME. I'll pacify her; I'll get her to see . . . She doesn't know Irene, she doesn't know how worthy she is. I shall tell your mother that the memory of my own mother lays upon me the obligation of taking that poor orphan under my wing, in view of the ancient debts of gratitude owed by my family to hers . . . Yes, I make that public for your consumption and your mother's too. The schoolmarm is now my sister; her misfortune moves me to confer that title upon her, and with it my public protection, which will go as far as need be to save a man's honor and a family's good name."

I was warming to it: every word made me think of other more vigorous ones.

"Your mother's worries are ridiculous. Let's leave family trees out of it, for otherwise you, your mother, and all the Peñas of Candelario would end up the losers..

"Yes," he shouted enthusiastically, "down with family trees!"

"And let's not talk about stumbling blocks to your career . . . You're getting a prize of a woman; why, your intended is capable of pushing you further perhaps than you might have gone with your own lights alone . . . ! Yes! Imagine even suggesting that she doesn't have plenty of enterprising spirit! Manuel, pay no attention to your mamma; hold your temper with her. Doña Javiera will give in; leave her to me."

The rest that we said is unimportant. I remained alone, somewhere between sorrow and gladness. I saw that what I had done was good, and this gave me a sufficiently great satisfaction to stifle my grief at times, as I contemplated it.

And although Doña Javiera came up that very night to find out the result of our conversation, I was not willing to be explicit with her.

"I've convinced him, madam, convinced him," was all I said to her.

-236-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Our Friend Manso
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 264

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.